Another technique for helping people feel more comfortable is to allow them to coach you during the demonstration.

For instance, if you're playing the role of a customer service representative who's dealing with an angry customer, people could suggest what you should do to make things right. In an effort to improve customer support, John, Customer Service Manager for Mythco Technologies, sets up a team role-playing session.

He divides the 12 people into two groups: Group A represents the customer support representatives; Group B represents the customer.

John tells Group A that the customer in this situation is one of Mythco's longest-standing customers. This customer accounts for nearly 15 percent of the company's overall annual revenue.

In short, the company cannot afford to lose her business! John tells Group B that the customer has recently received a software product that did not live up to expectations.

While the customer has a long-standing relationship with Mythco, this time she's growing weary because Mythco has previously sold her faulty software on two separate occasions.

Clearly, her relationship with Mythco is in jeopardy. Next — with this particular approach to role-play — each group sends forth an "actor" to take part in the role-play.

The actor receives support and coaching from members of the team throughout the role-playing process. Each team is able to take time-outs and regroup quickly as needed.

John runs through the scenario several times, starting with the "customer" behaving gently and ending with the customer behaving aggressively.

Each time, a best solution is found. Of course, John can always ask for additional role-playing and suggestions if he feels that the process needs to continue, or that the team has yet to uncover the very best solutions.

Once it's clear that they cannot identify any more solutions, John brings the two groups together and discusses the session. During this, they discuss the strategies and the solutions that the actors implemented, and how they could apply them to a real-life situation.

John also asks each team to write a short summary of what they learned from the exercise. He then combines the summaries and provides a copy of everything learned to all participants.

Role-playing happens when two or more people act out roles in a particular scenario. It's most useful for helping you prepare for unfamiliar or difficult situations.

You can also use it to spark brainstorming sessions, improve communication between team members, and see problems or situations from different perspectives. This site teaches you the skills you need for a happy and successful career; and this is just one of many tools and resources that you'll find here at Mind Tools.

Subscribe to our free newsletter , or join the Mind Tools Club and really supercharge your career! Expert Interviews Audio Forums Infographics. Quizzes Templates and Worksheets Videos.

For Your Organization. By the Mind Tools Content Team. Finding This Article Useful? Read our Privacy Policy. Key Points Role-playing happens when two or more people act out roles in a particular scenario.

To role-play: Identify the situation. Add details. Assign roles. Act out the scenario. Discuss what you have learned. Add this article to My Learning Plan.

Mark article as Complete. Show Ratings Hide Ratings. Rate this resource. Free Workbook Offer! Find Out More. Comments 6 Over a month ago Michele wrote. However, currently, these resources are available free of charge to all.

Please duplicate only the number of copies needed, one for each student in the class. Ten scenarios allow students to practice addressing employee issues ranging from suspected employee theft to personal hygiene.

Students are asked to rst assume the role of a manager and confront the employee on sensitive issues that frequently occur in the workplace, and then to assume the role of an HR manager and identify the HR implications in the scenario.

The scenarios challenge students to think on their feet, exercise judgment, and render a decision toward successful resolution. There is no separate student workbook; the instructor will distribute roles with details and information to the students as the group role plays each scenario.

By participating in these scenarios, students will be able to: nn Structure a conversation with an employee based on communication heuristics.

Set up a circle of chairs, and another circle of chairs inside it. Turn the chairs on the inner circle to face those on the outer circle so that students will have a partner for the exercise.

Make copies of the scenario sheet and cut into strips so there are enough individual scenarios to share in each round with all class members. Have students sit in the circles of chairs and face the student directly across from them.

Explain that the purpose of this exercise is to simulate the daily employeerelated issues that confront managers and supervisors; a good manager will quickly address issues as they occur rather than ignore them.

This exercise requires students to think on their feet and quickly become comfortable with employee confrontation. Plan on 8 to 10 minutes per round. You may want to prioritize the scenarios in case you run out of time.

Provide an overview of the exercise as detailed in the Introduction in the teaching notes Employees and Workplace Issue Discussions.

Distribute the rst scenario. Have students in the inner circle assume the role of supervisor, and students in the outer circle assume the role of employee.

In the next round, the inner circle will play the role of employee and the outer circle will play the role of supervisor, alternating roles each subsequent round. Provide 1 minute for everyone to read the scenario and think of an approach.

Encourage the students acting as employees to be true to the role and react as if the scenario personally affects them; it is ne be a little resistant to the supervisors message.

Give students minutes to engage in the supervisor-employee dialogue. Time allotted for each scenario will depend on the amount of class time available and the depth of the conversation you wish to achieve.

If you allow just 2 minutes for the discussion, it will put more pressure on the supervisor to push for a resolution to the problem.

Allowing 3 or more minutes for each conversation usually results in more specic agreement and a greater feeling of satisfaction for both parties. The instructor may want to vary the time allowed on different scenarios and explore with students the effect of time restraints on conversation.

At the end of each dialogue round, ask the questions as outlined in the teaching notes Scenario Debrief questions.

Move on to the next dialogue round. Have students in the outer circle move clockwise one chair to create new dialogue partners for the each round.

You are a supervisor in a warehousing operation. You recently instituted a No Smoking policy in the facility.

All employees were notied of the policy change. It was not well-received. As you walk down aisle B in the warehouse, you see a cloud of smoke and then see Chris running to aisle A.

You need to talk to Chris. You are an ofce manager overseeing a department of 25 people. One of your employees comes to you and complains about Pats unpleasant body odor and how difcult it is to work in the same area.

You agree to talk to Pat. You are the sales department manager at an upscale store. Your boss has talked to you about the appearance of some of your sales clerks particularly Alex.

Alex is sporting on his forearm a new, large tattoo of a devil eating a rat. You agree with your boss that some customers might nd it offensive and that it should somehow be covered up. You need to talk to Alex.

Sidney has recently been missing work. She tends to call in at the last minute, and there seems to be a pattern developing of Mondays and Fridays. Sidney has been in rehabilitation in the past for alcohol abuse.

You need to talk to Sidney. You are a project manager and supervise a team of 11 people. It is near Christmas, and you notice that within one day the ofce supply cabinet has been conspicuously depleted of tape, scissors, and packing materials.

Other than you, the administrative assistant, Lesley, is the only one with the key to the cabinet. You need to talk to Lesley. You are the director of human resources.

You asked your benets administrator, Morgan, to immediately send new benet information to your boss for her review. The next day, you are chewed out by your boss for not sending her the information.

You look bad. You decide to talk to Morgan. You are the vice president of nance. Your administrative assistant, Ryan, is often late getting to work.

You have tolerated it for the past year, but your workload has increased and you need all the help you can get, especially at the start of the day. With Ryan coming in late, it is starting to affect your ability to get your job done.

You need to talk to Ryan. You are an accounting manager, and the business relies on your department to produce accurate nancial reports the end of each month.

Your department uses Excel. Last month, you hired a new accountant, Taylor, who claimed to be procient in Excel. However, co-workers have come to you with complaints about Taylors work and questioning his abilities.

You need to talk to Taylor. You are a payroll manager supervising 25 people. Your team works in close quarters with little physical separation between work stations.

Drew is one of your best performers, yet you have received complaints that Drew tends to sprinkle conversations with rather crude and vulgar references.

This is not a team of saints, but some have complained that Drew is crossing the line. You need to talk to Drew. You are a marketing director supervising 18 professionals and support staff.

The nature of the work requires a collaborative environment where the professionals give work direction to the support staff. A professional on your team, Dana, has started dating a person on the support staff.

Although there is no policy prohibiting dating, several co-workers have complained about the two being too affectionate at work.

Some also indicate there is preferential treatment for Danas newfound love interest. You need to talk to Dana. See Conducting the Scenarios. A managers or supervisors role is to establish and maintain performance norms in the workplace.

Before taking any action, the supervisor should investigate the issue to see if a real problem exists. In these scenarios, the assumption is that the supervisor has already conrmed the situation or behavior that is described.

Some supervisors nd it difcult to confront others, or let other work distract them from this task. This exercise provides an opportunity to practice and become comfortable with confronting behavioral issues in the workplace.

Their body language must be that of a leader. Do students convey this persona? At the end of each of the rst two scenarios, ask the employees to provide feedback to the supervisors.

What is the tone of voice being used? Is it calm? Listen to see if the supervisor sounds apologetic. If so, this may alter the effectiveness of the message e.

What is the physical posture? Sitting up straight? Shoulders square with the employee, not turning away? What is the level of eye contact? Is the supervisor looking directly at the employee or looking elsewhere?

Many people avoid eye contact when confronting others or delivering an uncomfortable message. What is the level of engagement? Does the supervisor want to be there?

Is he or she distracted, or engaged in the conversation with the employee? It is important that managers are brief and concise in the message. Below is the suggested outline for confronting employees on workplace issues.

The example is that of the smoking violation. Purpose of meeting Avoid superuous questions or chatty conversation about the weather and get right to the point.

Chris, I have requested this meeting to talk to you about our smoking policy. Describe the behavior You were smoking in the warehouse today, and that is against our workplace rules.

What other information do you hear? The purpose of this meeting is to make you aware it is unacceptable and it shouldnt happen again. We are here to talk about what you are doing and what needs to change.

Thanks for being honest with me. Diversion to others Jill does it all the time and never gets in trouble! Avoid responsibility Wow, nobody told me about the rule. Accepts responsibility I did it. Agree on resolution Set the expectation for the employee.

Chris, it is against our work rules to smoke inside. I expect you to abide by our policy and never smoke inside again. If you break this rule in the future, you may be subject to further disciplinary action, up to and including termination.

Im sure you dont want that to happen. Can you agree that you will abide by the smoking policy? Document the discussion As Chriss manager, you should document the discussion and the agreement that resulted.

Other tips for the meeting 1. Be clear with the employee that you want to hear his or her explanation. Questions like the following will help facilitate the conversation: Why did you break the rules?

Why are you not performing up to standards? Do you want to improve? Do you think you can be successful? How can I, as your manager, help you to succeed? The focus of the meeting is not punishment.

It is on communication and collaborative problem solving. Ask yourself, Am I coming across as a parent scolding a child, or is the meeting about two adults trying to solve a work problem?

What has the employee learned about job expectations as a result of this meeting? Managers should reinforce the desired behavior with a follow-up meeting. If the employee has improved his or her performance, this is a great opportunity to reinforce the good behavior and provide the proper recognition for the employees effort.

If the employee is still struggling, then the follow-up provides the opportunity to re-assess the agreed improvement strategy with the employee. In this particular scenario, what was the challenge facing the supervisor?

I want to hear from the supervisors. What was your strategy going into the meeting? How did you plan on approaching this? As a supervisor, what seemed to work and what didnt? As an employee, how did you feel?

What worked for you? As an HR professional, what advice would you give the supervisor before his or her conversation with the employee? What potential HR issues are there in this scenario?

Are there any legal implications in terms of laws or regulations? Comments: This is a good opening scenario because it is straightforward. The policy was communicated.

Chris should be reminded of the rule and made aware of the consequences if she or he continues to break the rule. Work rules must be communicated, including the consequences of breaking the rules.

As an HR professional advising managers about implementing work rules, ask the questions: Does this rule have a business justication? Does it have an adverse impact on workers who fall into protected classes under antidiscrimination laws?

workplace scenarios for role play

You could then test and practice different approaches for handling situations, so that you can give participants experience in handling them. When you finish the role-play, discuss what you've learned, so that you or the people involved can learn from the experience.

You can learn another communication skills, like this, by joining the Mind Tools Club. For example, if you're using it as part of a training exercise, you could lead a discussion on the scenarios you have explored, and ask for written summaries of observations and conclusions from everyone who was involved.

Some people feel threatened or nervous when asked to role-play, because it involves acting. This can make them feel silly, or that they've been put on the spot. To make role-playing less threatening, start with a demonstration.

Hand two "actors" a prepared script, give them a few minutes to prepare, and have them act out the role-play in front of the rest of the group.

This approach is more likely to succeed if you choose two outgoing people, or if you're one of the actors in the demonstration. Another technique for helping people feel more comfortable is to allow them to coach you during the demonstration.

For instance, if you're playing the role of a customer service representative who's dealing with an angry customer, people could suggest what you should do to make things right. In an effort to improve customer support, John, Customer Service Manager for Mythco Technologies, sets up a team role-playing session.

He divides the 12 people into two groups: Group A represents the customer support representatives; Group B represents the customer. John tells Group A that the customer in this situation is one of Mythco's longest-standing customers.

This customer accounts for nearly 15 percent of the company's overall annual revenue. In short, the company cannot afford to lose her business!

John tells Group B that the customer has recently received a software product that did not live up to expectations. While the customer has a long-standing relationship with Mythco, this time she's growing weary because Mythco has previously sold her faulty software on two separate occasions.

Clearly, her relationship with Mythco is in jeopardy. Next — with this particular approach to role-play — each group sends forth an "actor" to take part in the role-play.

The actor receives support and coaching from members of the team throughout the role-playing process. Each team is able to take time-outs and regroup quickly as needed.

John runs through the scenario several times, starting with the "customer" behaving gently and ending with the customer behaving aggressively. Each time, a best solution is found.

Of course, John can always ask for additional role-playing and suggestions if he feels that the process needs to continue, or that the team has yet to uncover the very best solutions.

Once it's clear that they cannot identify any more solutions, John brings the two groups together and discusses the session. During this, they discuss the strategies and the solutions that the actors implemented, and how they could apply them to a real-life situation.

John also asks each team to write a short summary of what they learned from the exercise. He then combines the summaries and provides a copy of everything learned to all participants. Role-playing happens when two or more people act out roles in a particular scenario.

It's most useful for helping you prepare for unfamiliar or difficult situations. You can also use it to spark brainstorming sessions, improve communication between team members, and see problems or situations from different perspectives.

This site teaches you the skills you need for a happy and successful career; and this is just one of many tools and resources that you'll find here at Mind Tools.

Subscribe to our free newsletter , or join the Mind Tools Club and really supercharge your career! Expert Interviews Audio Forums Infographics.

Quizzes Templates and Worksheets Videos. For Your Organization. By the Mind Tools Content Team. Finding This Article Useful? Read our Privacy Policy.

Key Points Role-playing happens when two or more people act out roles in a particular scenario. To role-play: Identify the situation.

Add details. Assign roles. Please duplicate only the number of copies needed, one for each student in the class. Ten scenarios allow students to practice addressing employee issues ranging from suspected employee theft to personal hygiene.

Students are asked to rst assume the role of a manager and confront the employee on sensitive issues that frequently occur in the workplace, and then to assume the role of an HR manager and identify the HR implications in the scenario.

The scenarios challenge students to think on their feet, exercise judgment, and render a decision toward successful resolution. There is no separate student workbook; the instructor will distribute roles with details and information to the students as the group role plays each scenario.

By participating in these scenarios, students will be able to: nn Structure a conversation with an employee based on communication heuristics. Set up a circle of chairs, and another circle of chairs inside it.

Turn the chairs on the inner circle to face those on the outer circle so that students will have a partner for the exercise.

Make copies of the scenario sheet and cut into strips so there are enough individual scenarios to share in each round with all class members. Have students sit in the circles of chairs and face the student directly across from them.

Explain that the purpose of this exercise is to simulate the daily employeerelated issues that confront managers and supervisors; a good manager will quickly address issues as they occur rather than ignore them.

This exercise requires students to think on their feet and quickly become comfortable with employee confrontation. Plan on 8 to 10 minutes per round. You may want to prioritize the scenarios in case you run out of time.

Provide an overview of the exercise as detailed in the Introduction in the teaching notes Employees and Workplace Issue Discussions. Distribute the rst scenario. Have students in the inner circle assume the role of supervisor, and students in the outer circle assume the role of employee.

In the next round, the inner circle will play the role of employee and the outer circle will play the role of supervisor, alternating roles each subsequent round.

Provide 1 minute for everyone to read the scenario and think of an approach. Encourage the students acting as employees to be true to the role and react as if the scenario personally affects them; it is ne be a little resistant to the supervisors message.

Give students minutes to engage in the supervisor-employee dialogue. Time allotted for each scenario will depend on the amount of class time available and the depth of the conversation you wish to achieve.

If you allow just 2 minutes for the discussion, it will put more pressure on the supervisor to push for a resolution to the problem. Allowing 3 or more minutes for each conversation usually results in more specic agreement and a greater feeling of satisfaction for both parties.

The instructor may want to vary the time allowed on different scenarios and explore with students the effect of time restraints on conversation. At the end of each dialogue round, ask the questions as outlined in the teaching notes Scenario Debrief questions.

Move on to the next dialogue round. Have students in the outer circle move clockwise one chair to create new dialogue partners for the each round.

You are a supervisor in a warehousing operation. You recently instituted a No Smoking policy in the facility. All employees were notied of the policy change. It was not well-received. As you walk down aisle B in the warehouse, you see a cloud of smoke and then see Chris running to aisle A.

You need to talk to Chris. You are an ofce manager overseeing a department of 25 people. One of your employees comes to you and complains about Pats unpleasant body odor and how difcult it is to work in the same area.

You agree to talk to Pat. You are the sales department manager at an upscale store. Your boss has talked to you about the appearance of some of your sales clerks particularly Alex.

Alex is sporting on his forearm a new, large tattoo of a devil eating a rat. You agree with your boss that some customers might nd it offensive and that it should somehow be covered up. You need to talk to Alex.

Sidney has recently been missing work. She tends to call in at the last minute, and there seems to be a pattern developing of Mondays and Fridays.

Sidney has been in rehabilitation in the past for alcohol abuse. You need to talk to Sidney. You are a project manager and supervise a team of 11 people. It is near Christmas, and you notice that within one day the ofce supply cabinet has been conspicuously depleted of tape, scissors, and packing materials.

Other than you, the administrative assistant, Lesley, is the only one with the key to the cabinet. You need to talk to Lesley. You are the director of human resources.

You asked your benets administrator, Morgan, to immediately send new benet information to your boss for her review. The next day, you are chewed out by your boss for not sending her the information.

You look bad. You decide to talk to Morgan. You are the vice president of nance. Your administrative assistant, Ryan, is often late getting to work.

You have tolerated it for the past year, but your workload has increased and you need all the help you can get, especially at the start of the day.

With Ryan coming in late, it is starting to affect your ability to get your job done. You need to talk to Ryan. You are an accounting manager, and the business relies on your department to produce accurate nancial reports the end of each month.

Your department uses Excel. Last month, you hired a new accountant, Taylor, who claimed to be procient in Excel. However, co-workers have come to you with complaints about Taylors work and questioning his abilities.

You need to talk to Taylor. You are a payroll manager supervising 25 people. Your team works in close quarters with little physical separation between work stations. Drew is one of your best performers, yet you have received complaints that Drew tends to sprinkle conversations with rather crude and vulgar references.

This is not a team of saints, but some have complained that Drew is crossing the line. You need to talk to Drew. You are a marketing director supervising 18 professionals and support staff.

The nature of the work requires a collaborative environment where the professionals give work direction to the support staff. A professional on your team, Dana, has started dating a person on the support staff.

Although there is no policy prohibiting dating, several co-workers have complained about the two being too affectionate at work. Some also indicate there is preferential treatment for Danas newfound love interest.

You need to talk to Dana. See Conducting the Scenarios. A managers or supervisors role is to establish and maintain performance norms in the workplace.

Before taking any action, the supervisor should investigate the issue to see if a real problem exists. In these scenarios, the assumption is that the supervisor has already conrmed the situation or behavior that is described.

Some supervisors nd it difcult to confront others, or let other work distract them from this task. This exercise provides an opportunity to practice and become comfortable with confronting behavioral issues in the workplace.

Their body language must be that of a leader. Do students convey this persona? At the end of each of the rst two scenarios, ask the employees to provide feedback to the supervisors. What is the tone of voice being used?

Is it calm? Listen to see if the supervisor sounds apologetic. If so, this may alter the effectiveness of the message e. What is the physical posture? Sitting up straight?

Shoulders square with the employee, not turning away? What is the level of eye contact? Is the supervisor looking directly at the employee or looking elsewhere? Many people avoid eye contact when confronting others or delivering an uncomfortable message.

What is the level of engagement? Does the supervisor want to be there? Is he or she distracted, or engaged in the conversation with the employee? It is important that managers are brief and concise in the message.

Below is the suggested outline for confronting employees on workplace issues. The example is that of the smoking violation. Purpose of meeting Avoid superuous questions or chatty conversation about the weather and get right to the point.

Chris, I have requested this meeting to talk to you about our smoking policy. Describe the behavior You were smoking in the warehouse today, and that is against our workplace rules.

What other information do you hear? The purpose of this meeting is to make you aware it is unacceptable and it shouldnt happen again. We are here to talk about what you are doing and what needs to change.

Thanks for being honest with me. Diversion to others Jill does it all the time and never gets in trouble! Avoid responsibility Wow, nobody told me about the rule.

Accepts responsibility I did it. Agree on resolution Set the expectation for the employee. Chris, it is against our work rules to smoke inside.

I expect you to abide by our policy and never smoke inside again. If you break this rule in the future, you may be subject to further disciplinary action, up to and including termination.

Im sure you dont want that to happen. Can you agree that you will abide by the smoking policy? Document the discussion As Chriss manager, you should document the discussion and the agreement that resulted.

Other tips for the meeting 1. Be clear with the employee that you want to hear his or her explanation. Questions like the following will help facilitate the conversation: Why did you break the rules?

Why are you not performing up to standards? Do you want to improve? Do you think you can be successful? How can I, as your manager, help you to succeed?

The focus of the meeting is not punishment. It is on communication and collaborative problem solving. Ask yourself, Am I coming across as a parent scolding a child, or is the meeting about two adults trying to solve a work problem?

What has the employee learned about job expectations as a result of this meeting? Managers should reinforce the desired behavior with a follow-up meeting.

If the employee has improved his or her performance, this is a great opportunity to reinforce the good behavior and provide the proper recognition for the employees effort.

If the employee is still struggling, then the follow-up provides the opportunity to re-assess the agreed improvement strategy with the employee. In this particular scenario, what was the challenge facing the supervisor?

I want to hear from the supervisors. What was your strategy going into the meeting? How did you plan on approaching this? As a supervisor, what seemed to work and what didnt?

As an employee, how did you feel? What worked for you? As an HR professional, what advice would you give the supervisor before his or her conversation with the employee?

What potential HR issues are there in this scenario? Are there any legal implications in terms of laws or regulations? Comments: This is a good opening scenario because it is straightforward.

The policy was communicated. Chris should be reminded of the rule and made aware of the consequences if she or he continues to break the rule. Work rules must be communicated, including the consequences of breaking the rules.

As an HR professional advising managers about implementing work rules, ask the questions: Does this rule have a business justication? Does it have an adverse impact on workers who fall into protected classes under antidiscrimination laws?

Will we be able to enforce it?

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John tells Group A that the customer in this situation is one of Mythco's longest-standing customers. This site teaches you the skills you need for a happy and successful career; and this is just one of many tools and resources that you'll find here at Mind Tools. His subordinate is a computer whiz and offers to put software on the computer that allows him to get around the company firewall and access sites like Facebook and YouTube. John is European American who has been at the company for over ten years. What should Elisa do? Sonya feels this is rude and this practice makes her feel like an outsider. However, Tom does have the authority to make exceptions to the rule. Yolanda is extremely attractive, about five years older and charming. Role playing can be a very effective way to help employees learn how to deal with various types of conflict.

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The coworker is not a very good dresser and Ben could easily make fun of the way the coworker dresses. What article source Ernest do? View roe document on Scribd. However, you recently bought a very expensive house woriplace the monthly payment workplace scenarios for role play no problem scenaarios your here salary please click for source might be workplace scenarios for role play problem if your salary is drastically reduced as it would be with the startup. Some of these may be people who have to deal with the situation when it actually happens for example, salespeople. Demonstrate strategies to prevent, manage, or resolve interpersonal conflicts without harming self or others NHES 4. John also asks each team to write a short summary of what they learned from the exercise. However, Lori still feels uncomfortable about giving anyone an unfair advantage in an interview. Students can certainly read independently, but this feature is designed to be interactive. Jason is new to Japan and new to the company.

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Her son, John, needs some copies for a school project worplace arrives at workplzce office. Michael has workplacs problem with workplace scenarios for role play his secretary dresses. Saul more info like to talk about workplace scenarios for role play family and his personal life. There is no one else zappa plays zappa tour 2018 the office. Please wait Once you've set the scene, identify the various fictional characters involved in the scenario. Foster is aware that these sort of startups generally fail but the thought of being the next Steve Jobs excites him. Albert files a complaint with the company and claims this is an example of racism in the workplace. Chris knows all about this Chinese tactic but is tempted to just be honest and tell them he knows what they are doing and he is sick of Chinese mind games and they should just make a final offer one way or another.

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