Hicks had previously played the role of Scrooge on the stage many times beginning in , and again in a British silent film version.

On Christmas Eve in Ebenezer Scrooge Sir Seymour Hicks a cold-hearted and greedy elderly money-lender is seen working in his freezing counting house along with his suffering, under-paid clerk Bob Cratchit Donald Calthrop.

Two fellow business men arrive at the counting house to collect a donation for the poor from Scrooge but the old man instead supports the prisons and workhouses and goes as far to say if the poor would rather die then they 'better do it and decrease the surplus population'.

Scrooge catches Bob trying to take some coal but warns him he will be out of a job if he does not go back to work. Scrooge then refuses to dine with his only relative Fred his nephew and claims Christmas is 'Humbug!

That night after work Bob goes home to celebrate the holidays with his family while Scrooge dines alone at a seedy pub while the lords and ladies of London celebrate Christmas with the Lord Mayor of London.

At his house Scrooge encounters the ghost of his seven-year dead partner Jacob Marley Who is invisible in this version who wears a chain he 'forged in life' from his own wicked career.

He tells Scrooge he will be haunted by three spirits in order to escape his fate. The next sprit the Ghost of Christmas Present Oscar Asche shows Scrooge just how poor Bob and his family are as they have a meager Christmas dinner of goose and pudding.

The spirit threatens that unless the future changes Tiny Tim Philip Frost the youngest son who is ill will die. Scrooge then sees how others keep Christmas before seeing Fred celebrate with his wife and friends.

The Ghost of Christmas of yet to Come C. France shows Scrooge what lies in store the following year.

Scrooge discovers Tim is dead and that the man that was robbed and spoken of by some businessmen was himself after seeing his grave.

Scrooge returns home a changed man and becomes a generous person. He orders a turkey for Bob and his family, gives a healthy donation to the two men from the day before and dines with Fred.

The film then ends with Scrooge raising Bob's wages and that he will be a stepfather to Tim before the two attend church together.

The film differs from all other versions of the story in one significant way — most of the tormented spirits, including that of Jacob Marley , are not actually shown onscreen, although their voices are heard.

Only the Ghost of Christmas Present Oscar Asche is actually seen in full figure — the Ghost of Christmas Past is a mere shape with no discernible facial features, Marley's Ghost is seen only briefly as a face on the door knocker, and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is just an outstretched pointing finger.

Seymour Hicks plays both the old and young Scrooge. Albert Finney in the film Scrooge and Jim Carrey in the film A Christmas Carol are the only other actors to play both young and old Scrooge on film.

The story is also severely truncated. Much time is spent at the beginning of the film — before any of the ghosts appear — setting up the atmosphere of rich and poor London.

It is the darkness, death and despair brought on by urban poverty, and the joy and happiness generated by good will at Christmas that provides the two contrasting themes of Dickens' work.

It's fair to argue then, that any A Christmas Carol film worth its salt must convey the warmth and frivolity of Christmas time, through key scenes such as Scrooge's introduction to Christmas morning by the ghost of Christmas present and the Cratchit family Christmas dinner.

It must likewise demonstrate the gloom and misery of scenes such as the Ghost of Christmas Present unveiling the allegorical twin children of 'ignorance' and 'want' to Scrooge and the Cratchits grieving for the late Tiny Tim spoiler alert.

Arguably, however, despite its deserved place in the pantheon of British literary classics, there has yet to be a truly great cinematic adaption of Dickens' work.

For many of us, the only version that sticks in the mind may well be of the Muppet based variety, or perhaps the Alastair Sim film, arguably the closest we have had yet to a 'classic' version of the story.

Yet many different adaptations exist, many of them unknown, and most likely unseen, by the general public. I thought it was about time, therefore, that somebody stepped up and took on the task of wading through the assorted versions of A Christmas Carol so that at this festive season, we can truly know which offerings are worth seeking out.

It turns out that this last category was easily the most competitive. Scrooge is played by Seymour Hicks as a wide-eyed and angry old scruff. The actor regularly played Scrooge onstage and would go on to reprise the role in the sound version.

The main distinguishing characteristic of this adaptation is that it dispenses with the three Ghosts of past, present and future and instead has Marley stand in for all three.

The whole film is made all the eerier thanks to some very well selected backing music which accentuates the haunting moments perfectly.

This third silent offering is even shorter than Old Scrooge and so omits an even greater chunk of the original story. Russell Thorndike is suitably grumpy in the lead role, and all the ghosts are shown on screen, but of the three silent versions, this was not only the least enjoyable, but also suffered due to the fact that it was the worst preserved print of the three.

It feels a little churlish to criticise a film from 90 years ago for looking a bit fuzzy, though, so maybe we can let that slide.

The decision to not show the apparition of Marley and instead have Ebenezer talking to an empty chair like a Victorian Clint Eastwood is frankly ridiculous, as the film loses its ghostly element somewhat if the spirits are never even shown.

A lack of effects expertise seems an unlikely reason for this, given that earlier silent films had managed to include ghosts to a pretty decent standard.

One can only assume, therefore, that it is a foolhardy artistic decision. There are three distinct takes on the Scrooge character which actors and directors have opted for over the years.

Reginald Owen is a fairly bland and unmemorable Scrooge, edging more towards the pompous blowhard side of the character, but the actor never really convinces as an elderly man and there is some fairly visible age make-up on show throughout.

This version also has the first in a long line of nauseating Tiny Tims. Maybe that says more about me than him, though. It may not win prizes for its dynamism, but aided by a strong cast and wonderfully fuzzy soft lighting, it warms the cockles regardless.

A TV special narrated by Vincent Price with sets seemingly borrowed from a local school Christmas play and a cast with decidedly American accents.

I thought about putting that into more erudite and critical language, but came to realise it already summed up the situation perfectly. This is arguably the movie version of A Christmas Carol to which all others are compared.

Alastair Sim is absolutely superb as Scrooge, constantly disgruntled with the world; he is a mean and uncaring old man, but with a visible inner pain which few other Scrooges convey.

Dickens was surprisingly vague about both of these facts, and it seems to vary from film to film. The issue of Fan dying while giving birth to Fred is also never directly referenced by Dickens, but it crops up in several of the film adaptations.

Fully deserving of its place as a Christmas classic. An all-singing, all-dancing film starring Albert Finney in the titular role. The other ghosts in this version are a bit strange, the ghost of Christmas Past is just some non-descript old dear and the ghost of Christmas present opts to get Scrooge pissed in order to make him more cheerful.

Seems obvious now you think about it. The sight of some topless hooded demons, looking like extras from a Flash Gordon movie, dragging a chain around a screaming Scrooge, is frankly a bit much.

Admittedly, I only have a very limited knowledge of musicals and their merits, but it seems to me that the songs are all fairly average, though they are still annoyingly catchy be warned.

The Cratchit family are all irritatingly chipper throughout, although credit must go to the filmmakers for actually having a family of cockneys playing the roles of this working class London family.

Not one that many of you will be familiar with, but this Oscar-winning short film is well worth seeking out should you be so inclined. The first ghost is particularly trippy, as it swiftly zooms Scrooge from past memory to past memory.

There is also a particularly malevolent and mean Scrooge voiced by Alastair Sim, reprising the role he made his own in the screen version.

Truth be told, I actually watched this version by accident. I was expecting another animated version to arrive from a certain online film rental company, and they sent this one in error.

My mistake. It leaves huge swathes of the story out, has absolutely zero charm, and somehow looks more dated than the one from I genuinely believe that if four or five of us got together for a long weekend, we could knock up a better looking animated movie.

Obviously, with the story being Disneyfied somewhat, the darker edges have been largely trimmed off, although there is still something strangely unsettling about Black Pete as the gargantuan Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come.

We get a glimpse early on of Scrooge at the bank exchange ripping some fellow business men off over a deal involving some corn. The Ghost of Christmas Past does date the film somewhat, as she is quite possibly the most 80s ghost imaginable.

At one stage I thought it might actually be Toyah. Unfortunately, it also contains another incredibly annoying Tiny Tim who, to make look sicker, they have clearly just put dark make-up round his eyes.

It makes him look like a bit like a child zombie more than anything. Okay, granted, this is technically not a direct adaptation of A Christmas Carol, rather a Bill Murray comedy which happens to follow a similar plot.

However, the story of Francis Xavier Cross, the cruel and uncaring TV executive who mends his ways after being visited by three ghosts, is close enough in my book.

Murray is on peak form as the misanthropic ball of hate that is Frank Cross, and he's backed up by plenty of memorable supporting roles with special praise going to David Johansen, who is perfect as the cigar chomping Ghost of Christmas Past.

All the ghostly visitations are really neatly worked in, with the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come a particularly clever creation - its emergence from a bank of TV screens is especially effective.

True story. Scrooged is easily the finest Christmas comedy of all time, and deserves to be watched every year without fail.

who played the original scrooge

Hicks had previously played the role of Scrooge on the stage many times beginning in , and again in a British silent film version.

On Christmas Eve in Ebenezer Scrooge Sir Seymour Hicks a cold-hearted and greedy elderly money-lender is seen working in his freezing counting house along with his suffering, under-paid clerk Bob Cratchit Donald Calthrop.

Two fellow business men arrive at the counting house to collect a donation for the poor from Scrooge but the old man instead supports the prisons and workhouses and goes as far to say if the poor would rather die then they 'better do it and decrease the surplus population'.

Scrooge catches Bob trying to take some coal but warns him he will be out of a job if he does not go back to work. Scrooge then refuses to dine with his only relative Fred his nephew and claims Christmas is 'Humbug!

That night after work Bob goes home to celebrate the holidays with his family while Scrooge dines alone at a seedy pub while the lords and ladies of London celebrate Christmas with the Lord Mayor of London.

At his house Scrooge encounters the ghost of his seven-year dead partner Jacob Marley Who is invisible in this version who wears a chain he 'forged in life' from his own wicked career.

He tells Scrooge he will be haunted by three spirits in order to escape his fate. The next sprit the Ghost of Christmas Present Oscar Asche shows Scrooge just how poor Bob and his family are as they have a meager Christmas dinner of goose and pudding.

The spirit threatens that unless the future changes Tiny Tim Philip Frost the youngest son who is ill will die. Scrooge then sees how others keep Christmas before seeing Fred celebrate with his wife and friends.

The Ghost of Christmas of yet to Come C. France shows Scrooge what lies in store the following year. Scrooge discovers Tim is dead and that the man that was robbed and spoken of by some businessmen was himself after seeing his grave.

Scrooge returns home a changed man and becomes a generous person. He orders a turkey for Bob and his family, gives a healthy donation to the two men from the day before and dines with Fred.

The film then ends with Scrooge raising Bob's wages and that he will be a stepfather to Tim before the two attend church together. The film differs from all other versions of the story in one significant way — most of the tormented spirits, including that of Jacob Marley , are not actually shown onscreen, although their voices are heard.

Only the Ghost of Christmas Present Oscar Asche is actually seen in full figure — the Ghost of Christmas Past is a mere shape with no discernible facial features, Marley's Ghost is seen only briefly as a face on the door knocker, and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is just an outstretched pointing finger.

Seymour Hicks plays both the old and young Scrooge. Albert Finney in the film Scrooge and Jim Carrey in the film A Christmas Carol are the only other actors to play both young and old Scrooge on film.

The story is also severely truncated. Much time is spent at the beginning of the film — before any of the ghosts appear — setting up the atmosphere of rich and poor London.

In the s, his father was sent to a debtor's prison for outstanding arrears which he simply couldn't pay. As a result, year-old Charles was forced to board with a family friend and leave school to begin working ten hour days in a shoe-blacking factory.

Being from a relatively middle class background, Dickens struggled to fit in amongst the rest of his work colleagues and he had a fairly miserable time of it during this period. His experiences working in the cruel and backbreaking conditions of the factory, as well as the harsh treatment meted out to his father, had a profound effect on young Charles, and a great impact on his later literary work.

It was these experiences which led Dickens to write A Christmas Carol. The story centres upon the redemption of Ebenezer Scrooge, a heartless man of business who thrives of the despair of others.

Scrooge offers no pity towards the poor, and his heartless tirade at the portly gentlemen who come collecting for the poor on Christmas Eve "If they would rather die Of course, by the story's end, Scrooge is a changed man, who embraces the spirit of Christmas and becomes a second father to the children of his employee Bob Cratchit.

Scrooge's new found love of Christmas highlights the second most crucial point of A Christmas Carol. Dickens' wrote the tale at a time when forgotten Christmas traditions were experiencing a resurgence in popularity in Victorian England.

All of these traditions were gradually being re-introduced into society as the celebration of Christmas became not just a religious festival, but also a time of charity and family gatherings.

It is the darkness, death and despair brought on by urban poverty, and the joy and happiness generated by good will at Christmas that provides the two contrasting themes of Dickens' work.

It's fair to argue then, that any A Christmas Carol film worth its salt must convey the warmth and frivolity of Christmas time, through key scenes such as Scrooge's introduction to Christmas morning by the ghost of Christmas present and the Cratchit family Christmas dinner.

It must likewise demonstrate the gloom and misery of scenes such as the Ghost of Christmas Present unveiling the allegorical twin children of 'ignorance' and 'want' to Scrooge and the Cratchits grieving for the late Tiny Tim spoiler alert.

Arguably, however, despite its deserved place in the pantheon of British literary classics, there has yet to be a truly great cinematic adaption of Dickens' work. For many of us, the only version that sticks in the mind may well be of the Muppet based variety, or perhaps the Alastair Sim film, arguably the closest we have had yet to a 'classic' version of the story.

Yet many different adaptations exist, many of them unknown, and most likely unseen, by the general public. I thought it was about time, therefore, that somebody stepped up and took on the task of wading through the assorted versions of A Christmas Carol so that at this festive season, we can truly know which offerings are worth seeking out.

It turns out that this last category was easily the most competitive. Scrooge is played by Seymour Hicks as a wide-eyed and angry old scruff.

The actor regularly played Scrooge onstage and would go on to reprise the role in the sound version.

The main distinguishing characteristic of this adaptation is that it dispenses with the three Ghosts of past, present and future and instead has Marley stand in for all three.

The whole film is made all the eerier thanks to some very well selected backing music which accentuates the haunting moments perfectly. This third silent offering is even shorter than Old Scrooge and so omits an even greater chunk of the original story.

Russell Thorndike is suitably grumpy in the lead role, and all the ghosts are shown on screen, but of the three silent versions, this was not only the least enjoyable, but also suffered due to the fact that it was the worst preserved print of the three.

It feels a little churlish to criticise a film from 90 years ago for looking a bit fuzzy, though, so maybe we can let that slide.

The decision to not show the apparition of Marley and instead have Ebenezer talking to an empty chair like a Victorian Clint Eastwood is frankly ridiculous, as the film loses its ghostly element somewhat if the spirits are never even shown.

A lack of effects expertise seems an unlikely reason for this, given that earlier silent films had managed to include ghosts to a pretty decent standard.

One can only assume, therefore, that it is a foolhardy artistic decision. There are three distinct takes on the Scrooge character which actors and directors have opted for over the years.

Reginald Owen is a fairly bland and unmemorable Scrooge, edging more towards the pompous blowhard side of the character, but the actor never really convinces as an elderly man and there is some fairly visible age make-up on show throughout.

This version also has the first in a long line of nauseating Tiny Tims. Maybe that says more about me than him, though. It may not win prizes for its dynamism, but aided by a strong cast and wonderfully fuzzy soft lighting, it warms the cockles regardless.

A TV special narrated by Vincent Price with sets seemingly borrowed from a local school Christmas play and a cast with decidedly American accents.

I thought about putting that into more erudite and critical language, but came to realise it already summed up the situation perfectly.

This is arguably the movie version of A Christmas Carol to which all others are compared. Alastair Sim is absolutely superb as Scrooge, constantly disgruntled with the world; he is a mean and uncaring old man, but with a visible inner pain which few other Scrooges convey.

Dickens was surprisingly vague about both of these facts, and it seems to vary from film to film. The issue of Fan dying while giving birth to Fred is also never directly referenced by Dickens, but it crops up in several of the film adaptations.

Fully deserving of its place as a Christmas classic. An all-singing, all-dancing film starring Albert Finney in the titular role.

The other ghosts in this version are a bit strange, the ghost of Christmas Past is just some non-descript old dear and the ghost of Christmas present opts to get Scrooge pissed in order to make him more cheerful.

Seems obvious now you think about it. The sight of some topless hooded demons, looking like extras from a Flash Gordon movie, dragging a chain around a screaming Scrooge, is frankly a bit much.

Admittedly, I only have a very limited knowledge of musicals and their merits, but it seems to me that the songs are all fairly average, though they are still annoyingly catchy be warned.

The Cratchit family are all irritatingly chipper throughout, although credit must go to the filmmakers for actually having a family of cockneys playing the roles of this working class London family.

Not one that many of you will be familiar with, but this Oscar-winning short film is well worth seeking out should you be so inclined. The first ghost is particularly trippy, as it swiftly zooms Scrooge from past memory to past memory.

There is also a particularly malevolent and mean Scrooge voiced by Alastair Sim, reprising the role he made his own in the screen version.

Truth be told, I actually watched this version by accident. I was expecting another animated version to arrive from a certain online film rental company, and they sent this one in error.

My mistake. It leaves huge swathes of the story out, has absolutely zero charm, and somehow looks more dated than the one from I genuinely believe that if four or five of us got together for a long weekend, we could knock up a better looking animated movie.

Obviously, with the story being Disneyfied somewhat, the darker edges have been largely trimmed off, although there is still something strangely unsettling about Black Pete as the gargantuan Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come.

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Spirit of Christmas Future Ronald Sinclair An alien lands and tells the people of Earth that they must live peacefully or be destroyed as a danger to other planets. Ebenezer Scrooge Gene Lockhart The story is also severely truncated. To his delight, the spirits complete their visits in one night giving him the opportunity to mend his ways. But, what do the pale ghosts want? Theatrical release poster. We are also told that Ebenezer's mother died while giving birth to him, causing his father to resent him just as Ebenezer resents his nephew. Ebenezer Scrooge : It's me! Trailers and Videos.

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Animation Short Drama. The Monthly Film Who played the original scrooge. His sister Fan Carol Marsh arrives to take him home, plqyed their who played the original scrooge has link. The story is plaged severely truncated. Who played the original scrooge Played Armistice Day enthusiast in hospital in "Blighty" in Originla Jorkin, who does not appear at all in Dickens's original story, is discovered to be an embezzlerthe opportunistic Scrooge and Marley offer to compensate the company's losses on the condition that they receive control of the company for which they work — and so, Scrooge and Marley is born. The site's critical consensus reads, "Robert Zemeckis' 3-D animated take on the Dickens classic tries hard, but its dazzling special effects distract from an array of fine performances from Jim Carrey and Gary Oldman. Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures.

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Spirit of Christmas Present Ann Rutherford The Man in the White Suit Miracle in Milan Technical Specs. Who was Scrooge?

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