When you first think about playing the violin, most people think that it will be easier to play than it actually is. To play the violin well requires a lot of time and effort - you must be prepared to put in the quality practice required to be a good violinist.

To get the scratch out of your playing, instead of focusing on pressing the bow into the string, focus on gliding the bow across the string, like a dragonfly skimming across water. Focus intensely on this and your sound should become less scratchy.

Scratch is produced when there is too much tension in the arms and hands, so be sure to relax as much as you can! Don't press down too hard on the strings. Be firm, but remember the more relaxed you are, the more this will come through in the tone.

Play close to the bridge about 2 bow width's from the bridge this will produce the strongest, clearest sound possible on your violin.

Always play with your bow moving parallel to the bridge - sideways movement across the string will cause a wispy sound. For beginner players, the names of the fingers that we refer to are as important to know as the parts of the violin.

The right hand is known as the bow hand as this hand controls the bow , and the left the violin hand, which holds the violin. The fingers on both hands also have different names to differentiate them from one another.

On the violin hand, the fingers are known as the violin thumb, and the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers from thumb to pinky. You will often see numbers 1,2,3 or 4 above notes when reading written music, these numbers correspond to the names of the fingers you should use to play the note specified.

On the right hand the fingers are named slightly differently, according to the position that they take on the bow rather than their function.

The thumb is known as the bow thumb, the first finger is called the index finger, the middle two fingers are known as the huggers, and the fourth or littlest finger as the pinky.

The huggers are named as such because they 'hug' the bow, resting together on the side of the frog. The other fingers are named by their common names, to differentiate them from the numbered fingers of the left hand.

Unlike guitars, violins do not have fret markings which means instead of only being able to play in semitones, you can play a double sharp or double flat this is the note in between one semitone and another.

However, this also means that intonation is extremely important to become familiar with. A violinist must know to the millimeter where to place their finger in order to produce the right sound - which for a new learner can be very difficult to master.

When you are playing the violin, use the fingers you have put down on the string to guide you to the next note. For example, if you play a C on the A string, followed by a G on the D string, use your 2nd finger to guide your 3rd finger into the right position.

This makes it easier to play in-tune, and will help to increase the speed of your playing also. Timing, speed, and rhythm are very important when learning to play a musical instrument.

If the timing of the notes you play is incorrect, it is probably a good idea to slow down and work on the piece until you can play it flawlessly - then increase the speed.

A good tool to help with timing is a metronome. Luckily we have an Online Metronome here at Get-Tuned. Plucking - Violinists usually pluck the string with the bow still in their hand, using the pad of the index finger to pluck the string.

Some plucking passages can be no longer than one or two notes, so practicing making a fast transition between plucking and bowing is important. Vibrato - Vibrato is where the violinist rolls the finger back and forth on the string to waiver the pitch of the note.

This requires a very relaxed hand. Never slide the whole finger back and forth - the technique requires you to roll your finger forward and backward rather than slide the finger up and down the string.

Harmonics - Harmonics are high notes that require only a small amount of pressure on the string. Harmonics can be played either halfway, or quarter of the way down the string, by placing the finger as softly as a feather on the string.

Artificial harmonics can also be played by varying the length of the string by placing one finger firmly on the string, and the other finger above the firmly placed one softly to register the required harmonic.

Artificial harmonics are used near the end in the popular piece Czardas, composed by Italian composer Vittorio Monti. Spiccato - Spiccato is where the bow bounces very fast at the balance point of the bow.

It is best to learn this technique by video or in person as it requires demonstration in order to appreciate the complexity of the movement.

I build Fiddolins, taught by the inventor. I really need to learn how to clean a violin and what to use. Please help me. Thank for the information on how to play the violin, but pls show the fingering chart online, becos i dont have a professional violinist around me.

I got my violin last christmas and i still suck at it, i just cant get the bow movements right and no one has been able to give an adequate explaination, help?

I just want to share how excited I am about buying my first violin. I am 53 years old, and I have always played piano as my first instrument. I played clarinet and some flugel-bone in high school along with some percussion during concert band in high school and LOVED it!

I have always wanted to play violin, but was always told when I was younger, that it would be too hard for me. Well, now I'm 53 and I am determined to play this beautiful instrument that I have had on my bucket list for eons.

Nearly all violinists use a chin rest, which is a cheap, ergonomic piece of usually black plastic that clamps near the base of the violin and allows it to be held securely by your chin.

This is usually attached to the violin when the violin is built. Aside from that, be sure you have some rosin coagulated sap for your bow, a music stand, and a book of beginner lessons or songs, preferably in a format that will open flat.

Some violinists, especially beginners, also purchase a shoulder rest, which is a violin-width pad that sits on your shoulder underneath the violin and makes it easier to hold.

Many people start with a shoulder rest and eventually remove it after a few years. If the violin seems to dig into your shoulder when you play, consider purchasing one. Fiddlers, if they sing while performing, often hold the violin in the crook of an arm while playing, with the butt resting against their shoulder.

For them, chin rests and shoulder rests are generally pointless. A tuner is a small device that clips on to the scroll or the pegs of the violin.

It is useful for beginners if you are teaching yourself, as it can be used to make sure you are playing the notes correctly.

But once you know how to play the notes, the tuner isn't of much use anymore except for tuning the instrument itself. Be sure to take it off before big performances though, as it looks unprofessional.

Tighten the bow. Once you've set up your music stand and sheet music, open the case and remove the bow. The hair of the bow should be limp. Tighten the bow hair by turning the end screw clockwise until the space between the hair and the stick is big enough to pass a pencil through cleanly from tip to tip.

The hair should not be parallel to the wooden part of the bow, but with the wooden part curving slightly toward the hair. Don't use your pinky finger as a gauge because the oil from your skin will transfer to the hair, which needs to remain oil-free to get the best sound from the strings.

Rosin the bow. Rosin comes in two types, dark and light; either is fine to use, and neither is expensive. In warmer climates, light is preferred, dark is recommended in more northern areas.

If you live in an unpredictable climate, it is advisable to have both. It's usually a rectangle of hard, translucent material in a paper or cardboard casing that's open on two sides.

Grip the rosin by the papered sides and gently but vigorously rub it up and down along the length of the bow hair three or four times. You will need to rosin your bow about every time you practice.

You will see some light streaks if you scratched hard enough. Too much rosin will cause the bow to grip too well, producing a scratchy sound. If you over-rosin your bow, it's fine; it'll just take a few hours of playing to bring it back down to the correct level.

If this is a newly haired bow, it may need more rosin than normal. Draw the flat side of the bow hair across a string to see if it makes a clear sound after three or four strokes of rosin.

If it doesn't, add a couple more. Tune the violin. Set the bow aside for a moment and take the violin out of the case. The strings, in order from lowest tone to highest, should be tuned to G, D, A, and E.

Major adjustments can be made with the tuning pegs in the scroll of the violin, but if the tone seems only a little bit off, use the tiny metal dials near the bottom, called fine tuners , to make your adjustments instead.

Once you're satisfied, return the violin to the open case for a moment. You probably would like to have a professional tune your violin first. Rely on a tone whistle to find the correct notes, or simply look sound files up on the Internet.

Not all violins have fine tuners, but they can be installed by a shop. Some violins may have only one fine tuner, on the E string.

Some violinists can make do with just that one fine tuner, while others may prefer to get the rest. Grip the bow. Use the balance point to learn to hold the bow and even out the weight.

When you think you are ready to grip the bow like a professional, start by gently laying the middle part of your index finger on the grip the slightly padded part of the stick, usually a few inches above the tightening knob.

Place the tip of your pinky on the flat part of the stick near the base, keeping it slightly curved. The ring and middle fingers should rest with their middle parts in line with the tip of your pinky, and their tips on the side of the frog the black piece that connects the tightening knob to the hair.

Your thumb should rest underneath the stick, at the front of the frog, near or on the bow hair. It might feel a bit uncomfortable at first, but over time, it will form into a habit. Your hand should be relaxed and loose, and somewhat rounded as if holding a small ball.

Don't let your palm close or rest on the bow. This reduces the control you have over the movement of the bow, which becomes increasingly important as your skill increases.

Hold the violin. Stand or sit with a straight back. Pick it up by its neck with your left hand and bring the butt of the instrument up to your neck. Rest the lower back of the violin on your collar bone and hold it in place with your jaw.

To learn notes, however, you should hold it guitar style and buy a music book. It helps a whole lot. Your jaw, just under the earlobe not your chin , is supposed to be resting on the chin rest.

This helps prevent the instrument from sliding off your shoulder. This is also why violinists on TV always seem to be looking down and to the right. Perfect your hand position.

Place your hand under the top part of the neck and support the violin so that the scroll is pointing out away from you. Hold it steady by resting the side of your thumb on the neck, and allow your four fingers to arch over the fingerboard, which is the black plate covering the front of the neck.

Beware of the "waiter hand" where your left wrist is touching the fingerboard, just like how some waiters hold plates of food. This, too, could turn into a habit if you don't fix it.

As a beginner, your hand should be as far up the neck as possible while still allowing your pointer finger to come down on the fingerboard. Eventually, you'll learn to slide your hand up and down to reach higher notes quickly.

Play the strings. Pull the bow along the string as straight as you can, parallel to the bridge, applying a small amount of pressure. A sound should emanate from the violin.

Also, tilt the bow hair towards bridge at a degree angle. More pressure equals louder sound, but too much pressure makes it scratchy. Light pressure should produce a continuous tone from end to end of the bow; [7] if there are gaps, the bow needs more rosin.

If you play too close to the bridge, it may also sound scratchy. Tilt the bow slightly toward the scroll and your tone will be more focused, producing a more professional sound.

Practice playing open strings G,D,A and E in order from top to bottom string. Open strings are simply strings played without fingertips on them. Rest the neck of the violin in the space between the left thumb and first finger.

Hold the bow with your wrist, elbow, shoulder and contact point on the string within one plane. Change strings by raising or lowering the elbow to bring the bow to the proper height.

Try short strokes of 6 inches Work your way up to full-length strokes. Short and long strokes are both important techniques for playing the violin, so don't feel as though you're wasting time practicing with short strokes.

Continue practicing until you can play one string at a time without touching the other strings. It's important to develop control so you don't accidentally play a note you didn't want to play.

Practice playing other notes. It takes a lot of practice to master the pressure and positioning required to get your fingers to produce clear notes on the fingerboard. Start with your strongest finger, the pointer finger.

Using the tip only, press down firmly on the highest string the E string. You don't need to use as much pressure as you do with guitar strings; a modest but firm amount is enough.

Draw the bow across the E string to produce a slightly higher note. If you are holding the violin properly, your finger should naturally come down about half an inch below the nut the top of the fingerboard , producing an F note.

Add notes. Once you're able to produce a clear note, try putting the tip of your middle finger down a little ways below the pointer finger on the fingerboard.

Keep both fingers down and play another, higher note. Finally, set the ring finger ahead of the middle finger and repeat the process. The pinkie is also used, but takes considerably more practice to master.

For now, just worry about the other three fingers. Add strings. Try playing four notes open, pointer, middle, and ring on all four strings. Pay attention to the amount of pressure you need to produce a clear note on each one.

Practice scales. A scale is a series of notes that ascend and descend in a pattern of steps usually 8, sometimes 5 that starts at one note and ends at a higher or lower version of the same note.

An easy and useful scale for beginners is the D Major scale, which starts on the open D string. From there, place your fingers down in order as described above and play each note: D open , E, F sharp, G which should be produced by your third, or ring, finger.

To complete the scale, play the next highest open string, A, and then repeat the pattern on the A string to play B, C sharp, and finally D with your third finger.

If you can't seem to get the sound right, remember: place the first finger a finger's width from the nut, the second finger a finger's width from the first, and the third finger touching the second.

If you prefer, ask your music shop or teacher to tape the finger positions for you with white tape, so you have a visual guide. Other scales, such as minor, harmonic, and even pentatonic 5-note scales exist, but those can be studied, practiced, and internalized later.

Practice every day. Start with a short time 15 or 20 minutes and work a little longer every day until you reach an hour, or you can't find any more time to play. Serious violinists often practice for 3 or more hours per day; then again, many violinists at that level get money for playing.

Practice as much as you reasonably can, and keep at it. Even sounding good enough to play a few simple songs can take months, but eventually, things will begin to come together.

Equipment Needed to Play Violin. Basic Violin Techniques to Master. In general, ensure the size is right for you, as this cannot be changed and is essential to comfort and your ability to play.

Visit a reputable music store with assistants familiar with violins and ask them for help with holding different violins to see what is most comfortable for you; even better if they can play them for you, to allow you to hear the sound, or take along your new music teacher!

Yes No. Not Helpful 0 Helpful The violin is one of the harder instruments to learn to play well. Perfecting the technique, sound and developing your own personal style takes a few years of regular and dedicated practice.

You also need a willingness to correct yourself constantly until you produce a fine and melodious sound without effort, a stage which takes a lot of effort to reach! Not Helpful 1 Helpful In the realm of stringed instruments, the guitar is considered by many to be easier for beginners to learn to play than the violin.

The larger strings of the guitar, and the manner of holding it, make it easier as a beginner to both play and hold than the violin. However, both instruments require dedicated practice and a willingness to challenge yourself in order to play well.

Not Helpful 0 Helpful 6. It is possible but this is a particularly difficult instrument to learn without the advice, instruction and guidance of a good teacher who can adjust your posture, finger positioning, bow techniques, etc.

That depends on how much time you spend practicing. The more you practice, the better you will become. Usually it will take one to two years of constant practice and dedication to become "good" at playing violin, and longer to become "excellent".

But it also depends on talent, having a good ear for the music and being willing to practice a great deal each day. Not Helpful 47 Helpful Since your violin is new, chances are your bow is new too.

That means it will not be rosined. Without rosin, there is no 'grip', resulting in a soundless outcome. New bows tend to need lots of rosin, so be expected to rosin for at least 30 to 40 strokes!

Then, you can test the bow to see if it needs more rosin or not. Not Helpful 38 Helpful Is it necessary to get a chin rest? And which shop would you recommend? While it is possible to play without a chin rest, it's not ideal.

Chin rests give good support as you play the violin and help to protect your neck muscles as well. Try your local music shop, they should carry chin rests, or check online resources.

Not Helpful 41 Helpful This is a more advanced technique that your teacher or somebody should show you in person. To tune a violin you can use either the pegs or fine tuners.

Lots of beginners have fine tuners on their violins.

when you play the violin

If the timing of the notes you play is incorrect, it is probably a good idea to slow down and work on the piece until you can play it flawlessly - then increase the speed. A good tool to help with timing is a metronome.

Luckily we have an Online Metronome here at Get-Tuned. Plucking - Violinists usually pluck the string with the bow still in their hand, using the pad of the index finger to pluck the string.

Some plucking passages can be no longer than one or two notes, so practicing making a fast transition between plucking and bowing is important. Vibrato - Vibrato is where the violinist rolls the finger back and forth on the string to waiver the pitch of the note.

This requires a very relaxed hand. Never slide the whole finger back and forth - the technique requires you to roll your finger forward and backward rather than slide the finger up and down the string.

Harmonics - Harmonics are high notes that require only a small amount of pressure on the string. Harmonics can be played either halfway, or quarter of the way down the string, by placing the finger as softly as a feather on the string.

Artificial harmonics can also be played by varying the length of the string by placing one finger firmly on the string, and the other finger above the firmly placed one softly to register the required harmonic.

Artificial harmonics are used near the end in the popular piece Czardas, composed by Italian composer Vittorio Monti. Spiccato - Spiccato is where the bow bounces very fast at the balance point of the bow.

It is best to learn this technique by video or in person as it requires demonstration in order to appreciate the complexity of the movement.

I build Fiddolins, taught by the inventor. I really need to learn how to clean a violin and what to use. Please help me. Thank for the information on how to play the violin, but pls show the fingering chart online, becos i dont have a professional violinist around me.

I got my violin last christmas and i still suck at it, i just cant get the bow movements right and no one has been able to give an adequate explaination, help?

I just want to share how excited I am about buying my first violin. I am 53 years old, and I have always played piano as my first instrument.

I played clarinet and some flugel-bone in high school along with some percussion during concert band in high school and LOVED it!

I have always wanted to play violin, but was always told when I was younger, that it would be too hard for me. Well, now I'm 53 and I am determined to play this beautiful instrument that I have had on my bucket list for eons.

I just received my first violin today that I ordered online and I am thrilled with it. However I didn't know how to tune the instrument. So I googled how to tune a violin and found this site.

I'm thinking like I'll be using this site quite a lot with this new endeavor of mine. I'm so excited about it, I could burst! I will be playing it well before the beginning of this next year , I'm certain of it.

I can't wait to play it. I'll be sure to put in how I'm doing along the way! Thanks again for this site! Lorrie B of Cleveland Ohio.

The violin takes a lot of practice and concentration to do. I thank you for having this article,but I think you should add a little more topic and detail for my reading.

Again thank you. I am a beginner student of violin and need an iPhone App for tuning my violin. Haven't found one yet! I want to play so badly, Im 14 years old and am saving up for one. Unfortunately I can't get a job at this age, so lessons would be too expensive.

Is there anyway I can teach myself? I am jst crazy about violin music since clss seventh nd I bought it too but I hv failed to learn due to unfortunate luck..

How to Play the Violin. Builder I build Fiddolins, taught by the inventor. Nice vio by bill on Jun 27, PM.

How much can i get a good violin Thank for the information on how to play the violin, but pls show the fingering chart online, becos i dont have a professional violinist around me by Cornelius Ebhomienlen on Oct 10, PM.

Playing 10 years now and still sounds like a cat screeching. But I love it. Co-authored by Dalia Miguel Updated: July 3, There are 7 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

Purchase a violin. If you're just starting out with the instrument, there's no need to spend an excessive amount of money on a violin, but like most instruments, the quality of the violin generally rises as the price goes up.

Expect to spend a few hundred dollars on a decent beginner's violin. The violin is a small instrument, but there are specially designed smaller sizes available.

These are generally only intended for younger children, so be sure the violin you're buying is full size unless you're very small. You can ask the shop for a recommendation if you aren't sure.

When holding the violin in the playing position, straighten your left arm and the tops of your fingertips should be near the top the violin scroll. If your arm is way past the top, the violin is too small.

Buy from a reputable seller. Music stores stake their reputations on selling solid instruments that are free of obvious flaws and damage. As a beginner, you won't be able to coax a very pleasant sound from your instrument for some time, so flaws in privately sold violins might not be apparent to you until it is far too late to complain.

Only buy from a store or individual you can trust. Check the accessories. Unless you have purchased the instrument only, your violin outfit should come with a violin with four strings, a bow, and a carrying case and most of the time a chin rest and rosin for your bow.

A hard case is important because violins are such delicate instruments. Strings come in three basic varieties: gut, which is expensive and difficult to take care of, but which offers a complex range of sound; steel, which is loud and bright but can sound scratchy, and synthetic, which is smooth, clear, and not as unpredictable as gut.

Each type's name refers to the core material around which metal wire is wrapped to create the string. Most beginners should go with synthetic core strings, such as nylon core.

You can check this by looking at the hair of the bow the fine, white or off-white fibers and ensuring that the color is uniform and bright along its entire length. The hair of the bow should be a uniform width from end to end.

Bows wear down over time. You can get your bow re-haired for a small fee at most music shops. Purchase other items. Nearly all violinists use a chin rest, which is a cheap, ergonomic piece of usually black plastic that clamps near the base of the violin and allows it to be held securely by your chin.

This is usually attached to the violin when the violin is built. Aside from that, be sure you have some rosin coagulated sap for your bow, a music stand, and a book of beginner lessons or songs, preferably in a format that will open flat.

Some violinists, especially beginners, also purchase a shoulder rest, which is a violin-width pad that sits on your shoulder underneath the violin and makes it easier to hold.

Many people start with a shoulder rest and eventually remove it after a few years. If the violin seems to dig into your shoulder when you play, consider purchasing one.

Fiddlers, if they sing while performing, often hold the violin in the crook of an arm while playing, with the butt resting against their shoulder. For them, chin rests and shoulder rests are generally pointless.

A tuner is a small device that clips on to the scroll or the pegs of the violin. It is useful for beginners if you are teaching yourself, as it can be used to make sure you are playing the notes correctly.

But once you know how to play the notes, the tuner isn't of much use anymore except for tuning the instrument itself. Be sure to take it off before big performances though, as it looks unprofessional.

Tighten the bow. Once you've set up your music stand and sheet music, open the case and remove the bow. The hair of the bow should be limp.

Tighten the bow hair by turning the end screw clockwise until the space between the hair and the stick is big enough to pass a pencil through cleanly from tip to tip. The hair should not be parallel to the wooden part of the bow, but with the wooden part curving slightly toward the hair.

Don't use your pinky finger as a gauge because the oil from your skin will transfer to the hair, which needs to remain oil-free to get the best sound from the strings.

Rosin the bow. Rosin comes in two types, dark and light; either is fine to use, and neither is expensive. In warmer climates, light is preferred, dark is recommended in more northern areas.

If you live in an unpredictable climate, it is advisable to have both. It's usually a rectangle of hard, translucent material in a paper or cardboard casing that's open on two sides.

Grip the rosin by the papered sides and gently but vigorously rub it up and down along the length of the bow hair three or four times. You will need to rosin your bow about every time you practice.

You will see some light streaks if you scratched hard enough. Too much rosin will cause the bow to grip too well, producing a scratchy sound.

If you over-rosin your bow, it's fine; it'll just take a few hours of playing to bring it back down to the correct level. If this is a newly haired bow, it may need more rosin than normal.

Draw the flat side of the bow hair across a string to see if it makes a clear sound after three or four strokes of rosin.

If it doesn't, add a couple more. Tune the violin. Set the bow aside for a moment and take the violin out of the case.

The strings, in order from lowest tone to highest, should be tuned to G, D, A, and E. Major adjustments can be made with the tuning pegs in the scroll of the violin, but if the tone seems only a little bit off, use the tiny metal dials near the bottom, called fine tuners , to make your adjustments instead.

Once you're satisfied, return the violin to the open case for a moment. You probably would like to have a professional tune your violin first. Rely on a tone whistle to find the correct notes, or simply look sound files up on the Internet.

Not all violins have fine tuners, but they can be installed by a shop. Some violins may have only one fine tuner, on the E string.

Some violinists can make do with just that one fine tuner, while others may prefer to get the rest. Grip the bow. Use the balance point to learn to hold the bow and even out the weight.

When you think you are ready to grip the bow like a professional, start by gently laying the middle part of your index finger on the grip the slightly padded part of the stick, usually a few inches above the tightening knob.

Place the tip of your pinky on the flat part of the stick near the base, keeping it slightly curved. The ring and middle fingers should rest with their middle parts in line with the tip of your pinky, and their tips on the side of the frog the black piece that connects the tightening knob to the hair.

Your thumb should rest underneath the stick, at the front of the frog, near or on the bow hair. It might feel a bit uncomfortable at first, but over time, it will form into a habit.

Your hand should be relaxed and loose, and somewhat rounded as if holding a small ball. Don't let your palm close or rest on the bow.

This reduces the control you have over the movement of the bow, which becomes increasingly important as your skill increases. Hold the violin. Stand or sit with a straight back. Pick it up by its neck with your left hand and bring the butt of the instrument up to your neck.

Rest the lower back of the violin on your collar bone and hold it in place with your jaw. To learn notes, however, you should hold it guitar style and buy a music book.

It helps a whole lot. Your jaw, just under the earlobe not your chin , is supposed to be resting on the chin rest. This helps prevent the instrument from sliding off your shoulder.

This is also why violinists on TV always seem to be looking down and to the right. Perfect your hand position. Place your hand under the top part of the neck and support the violin so that the scroll is pointing out away from you.

Hold it steady by resting the side of your thumb on the neck, and allow your four fingers to arch over the fingerboard, which is the black plate covering the front of the neck. Beware of the "waiter hand" where your left wrist is touching the fingerboard, just like how some waiters hold plates of food.

This, too, could turn into a habit if you don't fix it. As a beginner, your hand should be as far up the neck as possible while still allowing your pointer finger to come down on the fingerboard.

Eventually, you'll learn to slide your hand up and down to reach higher notes quickly. Play the strings. Pull the bow along the string as straight as you can, parallel to the bridge, applying a small amount of pressure.

A sound should emanate from the violin. Also, tilt the bow hair towards bridge at a degree angle. More pressure equals louder sound, but too much pressure makes it scratchy. Light pressure should produce a continuous tone from end to end of the bow; [7] if there are gaps, the bow needs more rosin.

If you play too close to the bridge, it may also sound scratchy. Tilt the bow slightly toward the scroll and your tone will be more focused, producing a more professional sound.

Practice playing open strings G,D,A and E in order from top to bottom string. Open strings are simply strings played without fingertips on them. Rest the neck of the violin in the space between the left thumb and first finger.

Hold the bow with your wrist, elbow, shoulder and contact point on the string within one plane. Change strings by raising or lowering the elbow to bring the bow to the proper height.

Try short strokes of 6 inches Work your way up to full-length strokes. Short and long strokes are both important techniques for playing the violin, so don't feel as though you're wasting time practicing with short strokes.

Continue practicing until you can play one string at a time without touching the other strings. It's important to develop control so you don't accidentally play a note you didn't want to play.

Practice playing other notes. It takes a lot of practice to master the pressure and positioning required to get your fingers to produce clear notes on the fingerboard. Start with your strongest finger, the pointer finger.

Using the tip only, press down firmly on the highest string the E string. You don't need to use as much pressure as you do with guitar strings; a modest but firm amount is enough.

Draw the bow across the E string to produce a slightly higher note. If you are holding the violin properly, your finger should naturally come down about half an inch below the nut the top of the fingerboard , producing an F note.

Add notes. Once you're able to produce a clear note, try putting the tip of your middle finger down a little ways below the pointer finger on the fingerboard. Keep both fingers down and play another, higher note.

Finally, set the ring finger ahead of the middle finger and repeat the process. The pinkie is also used, but takes considerably more practice to master. For now, just worry about the other three fingers.

Add strings. Try playing four notes open, pointer, middle, and ring on all four strings. Pay attention to the amount of pressure you need to produce a clear note on each one. Practice scales.

A scale is a series of notes that ascend and descend in a pattern of steps usually 8, sometimes 5 that starts at one note and ends at a higher or lower version of the same note.

An easy and useful scale for beginners is the D Major scale, which starts on the open D string. From there, place your fingers down in order as described above and play each note: D open , E, F sharp, G which should be produced by your third, or ring, finger.

To complete the scale, play the next highest open string, A, and then repeat the pattern on the A string to play B, C sharp, and finally D with your third finger. If you can't seem to get the sound right, remember: place the first finger a finger's width from the nut, the second finger a finger's width from the first, and the third finger touching the second.

If you prefer, ask your music shop or teacher to tape the finger positions for you with white tape, so you have a visual guide.

Other scales, such as minor, harmonic, and even pentatonic 5-note scales exist, but those can be studied, practiced, and internalized later. Practice every day. Start with a short time 15 or 20 minutes and work a little longer every day until you reach an hour, or you can't find any more time to play.

Serious violinists often practice for 3 or more hours per day; then again, many violinists at that level get money for playing. Practice as much as you reasonably can, and keep at it.

Even sounding good enough to play a few simple songs can take months, but eventually, things will begin to come together. Equipment Needed to Play Violin. Basic Violin Techniques to Master.

In general, ensure the size is right for you, as this cannot be changed and is essential to comfort and your ability to play. Visit a reputable music store with assistants familiar with violins and ask them for help with holding different violins to see what is most comfortable for you; even better if they can play them for you, to allow you to hear the sound, or take along your new music teacher!

Yes No. Not Helpful 0 Helpful The violin is one of the harder instruments to learn to play well. Perfecting the technique, sound and developing your own personal style takes a few years of regular and dedicated practice.

You also need a willingness to correct yourself constantly until you produce a fine and melodious sound without effort, a stage which takes a lot of effort to reach! Not Helpful 1 Helpful

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I'm Zlata Classical violinist , teacher and bowing technique nerd helping you play the music you love passionately. Unlike guitars, violins do not have fret markings which means instead of only being able to play in semitones, you can play a double sharp or double flat this is the note in between one semitone and another. It is very difficult and it takes a lot of practising, but every week I learn something new. I purchased a violin from Shar Music. Check to see if your bow is sliding on the violin strings. The strings will need to be replaced if broken. Play close to the bridge about 2 bow width's from the bridge this will produce the strongest, clearest sound possible on your violin. I am not a musician but love music. Co-Authored By:.

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Not Helpful 12 Helpful Http://howwouldyouvote.us/how-to-play-flamenco-guitar.html are very helpful for beginner violinists. They are usually never very when you play the violin in quality and may cost when you play the violin than they are worth to repair. If you are when you play the violin on learn more here yourself, purchase a workbook. These are generally only intended for younger children, so be sure the violin you're buying is full size unless you're very small. Pluck the strings at the fingerboard. Vibrato - Vibrato is where the violinist rolls the finger back and forth on the string to waiver the pitch of the note. Don't use your pinky finger as a gauge because the oil from your skin will transfer to the hair, which needs to remain oil-free to get the best sound from the strings.

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What could be wrong? When you play the violin finger is C. Jumping when you play the violin a new instrument and unfamiliar area is difficult, yet this page helps and I absolutely love the photos, they help a lot. The right hand is known as the bow hand as this hand controls the bowand the left the violin hand, which holds the violin. Shery Jul 14,

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