Parents act as chauffeur and cheerleader, but is all the frenzy good for the family? Hide Caption. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Pee-wee soccer is a big team sport for small children. What 4-year-old is ready," asks mother Christina Comstock.

Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Parents want to help kids find their talents and passions, whether flute or football.

But don't feel pressured to put your kids into too many activities, says clinical psychologist Paula Bloom. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Whether or not your child is destined to become an Olympic gymnast, it's critical to teach kids they're not defined by what they do, but by who they are, says Bloom.

Overscheduled kids, harried parents — CNN's Josh Levs enrolled his eldest son in tennis lessons as a kindergartener but wonders if there were many other activities he should be trying. It's a trap many parents fall into.

Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Activities outside the classroom can help children develop discipline and independence. Bloom recommends being choosy about which activities to pick.

Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Activities like scouting can take a lot of time and resources from the whole family and might conflict with other sports or hobbies.

The key is to find balance, Levs says. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — If you tell your child to choose between two major activities, such as karate or ballet, will she someday resent having missed out on the other?

Perhaps, Bloom says, but parents need to accept that. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — The key is to focus on the life lessons your kids are learning and not stress over the specific activities, Levs says.

The goal is a confident child who knows how to "shine," he says. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Kids need time to explore and create their own rules and boundaries, says Robert Stephens, a dad and trainer.

It can make for a more resourceful child. Story highlights After an article about overscheduled children, readers shared their thoughts Some commenters said childhood should be a time of freedom and character-building Some say a key childhood right is to play outdoors without hovering parents Some said play dates can be restrictive and take the imagination out of playtime.

Josh Levs. Those were the sentiments behind many passionate responses to my column, "Overscheduled kids, anxious parents," about the conundrum facing millions of parents like me: Determining how many, and which, activities in which to enroll our kids.

On CNN. They were largely in agreement. With children penned in by too much structure, lacking the chance and encouragement to "go out and play," make up their own games and use their imaginations, we're hurting them, readers said.

Just about everywhere I've gone since the column published, people have stopped me to say they agree with a clinical psychologist I quoted, who argued that hectic schedules are damaging American families.

Many also agree with a trainer who said kids should wait until they're 11 or 12 to join league sports. In our Facebook discussion , Gary Simmons wrote that organized sports "are good for kids, but not if that's the only time they play.

Playing pickup games, with no parent around overcoaching and killing the fun, is how kids develop passion and instincts for sports. It's when they develop their game. The inner-city athlete has changed the way basketball is played today.

They grew up playing on their own. They knew how to solve problems because they had solved them before. They knew how to dream up new possibilities because they had been doing that since they were a kid.

This brings me to the startling truth: If we allow the current generation to be satisfied thinking within a 9. If we don't remove easy entertainment from our children, they'll never learn to create their own.

I don't know what the answer is for your family and your children -- but we must be drastic. It's time to stop saying, "But it's just easier to plop them down with the iPad.

Even Steve Jobs, the visionary behind the iPad, didn't let his kids use the iPad. He pushed them to play outside, read books and be fascinated with good conversation.

It's time to look inward. Are we losing the sense of wonder that we used to posses? Are our children simply following in our footsteps?

Are we grownups forgetting the adventures we had? Are we lazily reading Twitter instead of showing our kids the endless possibilities of curiosity and dreams? We have the potential to create a new generation of kids who can imagine and explore -- who can think outside the box and create exciting things.

If we don't, those little maple leafs will go unplanted and eventually die. The ants won't have a fort to play in. The beans and peas won't have a friend to look after them everyday -- and, more importantly, the future "iPads" or whatever is next won't be created.

Let's raise a generation of kids that build bird houses and sprinkler shows. A generation that plants bean seeds, maple leafs or whatever else their minds can dream up.

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. Not only that, but how did they think to create something like an iPad in the first place?

You weren't dependent on someone else's creativity and ingenuity. You knew how to dream. To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk.

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what happened to playing outside

Parents act as chauffeur and cheerleader, but is all the frenzy good for the family? Hide Caption. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Pee-wee soccer is a big team sport for small children.

What 4-year-old is ready," asks mother Christina Comstock. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Parents want to help kids find their talents and passions, whether flute or football. But don't feel pressured to put your kids into too many activities, says clinical psychologist Paula Bloom.

Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Whether or not your child is destined to become an Olympic gymnast, it's critical to teach kids they're not defined by what they do, but by who they are, says Bloom.

Overscheduled kids, harried parents — CNN's Josh Levs enrolled his eldest son in tennis lessons as a kindergartener but wonders if there were many other activities he should be trying.

It's a trap many parents fall into. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Activities outside the classroom can help children develop discipline and independence. Bloom recommends being choosy about which activities to pick.

Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Activities like scouting can take a lot of time and resources from the whole family and might conflict with other sports or hobbies.

The key is to find balance, Levs says. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — If you tell your child to choose between two major activities, such as karate or ballet, will she someday resent having missed out on the other?

Perhaps, Bloom says, but parents need to accept that. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — The key is to focus on the life lessons your kids are learning and not stress over the specific activities, Levs says.

The goal is a confident child who knows how to "shine," he says. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — Kids need time to explore and create their own rules and boundaries, says Robert Stephens, a dad and trainer.

It can make for a more resourceful child. Story highlights After an article about overscheduled children, readers shared their thoughts Some commenters said childhood should be a time of freedom and character-building Some say a key childhood right is to play outdoors without hovering parents Some said play dates can be restrictive and take the imagination out of playtime.

Josh Levs. Those were the sentiments behind many passionate responses to my column, "Overscheduled kids, anxious parents," about the conundrum facing millions of parents like me: Determining how many, and which, activities in which to enroll our kids.

On CNN. They were largely in agreement. With children penned in by too much structure, lacking the chance and encouragement to "go out and play," make up their own games and use their imaginations, we're hurting them, readers said.

Just about everywhere I've gone since the column published, people have stopped me to say they agree with a clinical psychologist I quoted, who argued that hectic schedules are damaging American families.

Many also agree with a trainer who said kids should wait until they're 11 or 12 to join league sports. In our Facebook discussion , Gary Simmons wrote that organized sports "are good for kids, but not if that's the only time they play.

Playing pickup games, with no parent around overcoaching and killing the fun, is how kids develop passion and instincts for sports.

It's when they develop their game. The inner-city athlete has changed the way basketball is played today. They grew up playing on their own. To build it, a team of brilliant people had to solve crucial problems, invent countless components and continually choose to not give up.

I remember a story one Apple executive told of his team receiving all the parts for the new iPad and then having to figure out how to fit them all into the smallest shell possible.

It had to be thin, light and beautiful. How did they do it? Then I remembered growing up in the small town of West Linn, Oregon.

Many days were spent running around in the backyard, hooking up hoses, sprinklers and water-switches to create cool water shows. I remembered building forts with tarps and wood.

I even remembered creating little ant houses with small twigs for walls, ramps and furniture. I thought back to racing out to my garden the morning after planting beans or peas to see if they had magically sprouted over night, or making whistles by blowing on thick blades of grass.

I remembered grabbing some pieces of scrap wood, a hammer and nails to try to make a birdhouse. I recalled discovering a tiny maple tree leaf sticking out of the ground -- and noticing it was connected to the dirt.

I remembered digging it up and replanting it in a proper place in the backyard. I watered and nurtured it until I moved out, watching it grow from a single leaf into a beautiful, full grown, 30 foot tree that provided shade for our house.

Then, in the winter months when it was too cold to be outside, the thousands of hours creating whole worlds, governments and economies out of Legos and Monopoly money.

I didn't like sets -- I just wanted a bucket of Legos to build whatever my little head could dream up. If you're over the age of 20 or 30, I'm sure you have similar stories of adventures in the woods -- of having to solve problems and think outside the box.

You probably recall creating your own fun with seemingly boring items. You didn't need someone to entertain you or design things for you to have fun with.

You could create a game with pinecones and sticks. When this past generation of Apple creators sat down to dream up the next product, I believe they subconsciously drew back on their own "backyard" roots.

They knew how to solve problems because they had solved them before. They knew how to dream up new possibilities because they had been doing that since they were a kid.

This brings me to the startling truth: If we allow the current generation to be satisfied thinking within a 9. If we don't remove easy entertainment from our children, they'll never learn to create their own.

I don't know what the answer is for your family and your children -- but we must be drastic. It's time to stop saying, "But it's just easier to plop them down with the iPad.

Even Steve Jobs, the visionary behind the iPad, didn't let his kids use the iPad. He pushed them to play outside, read books and be fascinated with good conversation. It's time to look inward. Are we losing the sense of wonder that we used to posses?

Are our children simply following in our footsteps? Are we grownups forgetting the adventures we had? Are we lazily reading Twitter instead of showing our kids the endless possibilities of curiosity and dreams?

We have the potential to create a new generation of kids who can imagine and explore -- who can think outside the box and create exciting things. If we don't, those little maple leafs will go unplanted and eventually die.

football video games to play

I was in a ton of scuffles and sometimes rolling on the grass became the best game for me. Parents act as chauffeur and cheerleader, but is all the frenzy good for the family? Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Sun exposure also plays a role our immune system in other ways, as well as in healthy sleep — and in our mood. Children are spending less time outdoors and suffering from nature-deficit disorder. But there are too few days in which they and their friends are home and free at the same time. Our neighborhoods, once the classic microcosm of a free America, have devolved into little more than supervised "dorms. It refers to children having less experience with and connection to nature over the last couple of decades.

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How Did We Get What happened to playing outside But as parents, we're more aware please click for source the danger than previous generations were. Advertise With Us. Outside what happened to playing outside is so important for healthy child development. The Outdoor Foundation surveyed 40, people and found an overall decrease in what happened to playing outside amount of time children participated in outdoor activities. Overscheduled kids, harried parents — If you tell your child to choose between two major activities, such as karate or ballet, will she someday resent having missed out on the other? They can certainly exercise indoors, but sending them outdoors — especially with something like a ball or a bike — encourages active play, which is really the best exercise for children. In other words, be mindful of nature around you. And do everything you can to be sure that every child can do the same.

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Overscheduled kids, harried what happened to playing outside — What happened to playing outside like what happened to playing outside can take a lot of time article source resources click here the whole family and might conflict angel and devil chess other sports continue reading hobbies. We live in Florida and I have struggled with sun damage, so I am anxious about making sure they are covered up what happened to playing outside playing in the shade. Hell yes, she did and so did all the other moms. OPAL Outdoor Play and Learning is a not for profit dedicated to ensuring all elementary and primary school children have an hours high quality play opportunity every school day. Many also agree with a trainer who said kids should wait until they're 11 or 12 to join league sports. Playing pickup games, with no parent around overcoaching and killing the fun, is how kids develop passion and instincts for sports. These are the skills that help us plan, prioritize, troubleshoot, negotiate, and multitask ; they are crucial for our success. And out of fear, we're depriving them of what childhood should be -- a time of freedom and character-building. But don't feel pressured to put your kids into too many activities, says clinical psychologist Paula Bloom. Comments comments.

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