All remaining players stand at one end of the area home. The aim of the game is to run from one end of the field of play to the other, without being caught by the bulldogs.

When a player is caught, they become a bulldog themselves. The winner is the last player or players 'free'. The play area is flexible—it can be played on a street, a playground, between cloisters, in a large hall or on an area of a playing field —though there is no set size of the pitch nor set number of players as long as there is enough space for the players to run about and enough players to have fun.

It is played mainly in the United Kingdom , the Republic of Ireland , South Africa , Australia , the United States as sharks and minnows , New Zealand as bullrush or kingasini , [1] Canada and other Commonwealth countries by children at school.

Variants of the game have been recorded from the nineteenth century. It originated in the United Kingdom. Many British schools in the 21st century still do not allow children to play it, but some schools allow children to play it as long as it is non-contact i.

Sharks and Minnows derives from a German war game called Minsk und Reich. As is usual with games, the particular rules applied vary from location to location, but with the same principle. The playing area consists of a main playing area, with two 'home' areas on opposing sides similar to the try-zone areas used in rugby or American football.

The home areas are the width of the playing area and are usually marked by a line or some other marker. Each game of bulldogs consists of a sequence of rounds, and it is usual to play a number of games one after another with different bulldogs each time.

The game is initiated with a single player or sometimes two or more players as the "bulldog" or "catcher" between the home areas and the other players together in one of the home areas. The objective for the non-bulldog players is to run from one home area to the other whilst avoiding the bulldog s in the middle.

In the later stages of the game the bulldogs will outnumber the remaining non-bulldog players, which can make captures especially rough as many bulldogs attempt to capture individual players.

The method of choosing of the first bulldog s is subject to variation. In one version, the bulldog is selected by all players standing in a circle with their legs apart and a tennis ball being bounced in the centre; whoever's legs the ball goes through is "it".

Sometimes, the players must run to a set target, the last one there becoming the bulldog. In later games, either the first or the last players caught in the previous game may become the bulldog s for the next game.

Each round is usually initiated by the bulldog s chanting and goading, often naming a player to be the first to attempt the run from one home area to the other. In some versions all of the non-bulldogs rush across at once, in others this rush is triggered, either by the bulldog s or by the named player.

Once players are out of the home area the bulldog s can attempt to 'catch' them; caught players become bulldogs as well. The method by which a runner is caught varies according to local custom.

It is common for a player to be caught by the bulldog s either holding the non-bulldog off the ground, or by tackling the non-bulldog and holding them stationary, while the bulldog exclaims a phrase such as "British bulldog; one, two, three!

A simpler alternative is for the bulldog s to just touch the non-bulldog s head or back and exclaim the appropriate phrase.

Capture by tackling or lifting was popular in the twentieth century, although tackling has become more common than lifting in the modern version of the game.

In some versions, non-bulldogs also become bulldogs if they cross a boundary equivalent to a touch-line. It can be a valid method of capture for a bulldog to force a non-bulldog over the boundary.

If the non-bulldog player s successfully enter the opposing home area without being caught, they are considered 'safe' and may not be caught by the bulldog s.

Players are also safe while they remain in their original home area, although there are sometimes rules for how long they may remain there. The rush also known as the 'bullrush', 'open gates' or 'stampede' may be triggered by the bulldog or the single, named player shouting a phrase such as "bulldog" or "bullrush", or it may occur when the named player is either captured or safe in the other home area.

However, in other versions only the first player caught in each round becomes a bulldog, catching other players is simply for fun and has no strategic advantage. The aim of the game for the bulldogs is to catch all the players as quickly as possible, whilst the aim for the other players is to stay uncaught for as long as possible.

The last player to be caught is usually considered the winner. A variant called bacca also known as action and fox and dowdy was played in the nineteenth century at King Edward's School, Birmingham.

In this version, the home areas were either end of the cloisters. A catcher must hold another player and say the phrase "One, two, three, caught, tobacco" to capture them.

The phrase was the source of the game's name. In a similarly titled version called baccare , the rush is triggered by the leader of the non-catcher players calling "Baccare" or by any of the players being tricked into saying it by the catcher s.

An example given is a catcher asking "What does your father smoke? In the variant black tom , from early twentieth century America, the catcher triggers the rush of players by shouting "Black Tom" three times.

The catcher may attempt to trick players by shouting a false signal, such as "Black Tim" or "Red Tom"; any players who attempt to run on such a signal are automatically caught and join the catcher.

Chinese wall or hill, dill, come over the hill is another variant, where the catcher is confined between two lines smaller than the larger field the "wall" and players must cross the "wall" without being caught.

A variant recorded in Marlborough, Wiltshire was called click. In this game, being the catcher was known as going Click. The catcher s caught other players by holding them while saying the phrase "One, two, three, I catch thee; help me catch another.

A variant recorded in the late nineteenth century is cock. In this game, the catcher is known as "cock" and there is no named, single player; all the non-catcher players run from one home area to the other at once.

The cock attempts to capture or "croon" in this version the other players by putting their hand on the non-catcher player's head. A similar game was played in Scotland called rexa-boxa-king.

In this game, the catcher is called "king" or "queen" and triggers the rush with the phrase "rexa-boxa-king" or "rexa-boxa".

The last player captured becomes king in the next game. Runners begin at the top of a steep, heavily forested hill and catchers are positioned about half-way down the hill.

A gentler variant popular in Britain is fishy fishy. The set up is the same as bulldog, with a group of runners on one side of the area and one or two catchers in the middle. The runners chant a phrase such as "Fishy, Fishy, may we cross your golden water?

In The Midlands of England, the phrase "Please Mr[s] Crocodile, can we cross the water in a cup and saucer, upside down? This means the runners run across in smaller groups, instead of one large group, and the catchers only typically need to tag the runners to turn them into catchers, rather than tackle them to the ground.

A variant in America similar to fishy fishy is sharks and minnows , in which the original selected player s are the sharks, who attempt to "eat" the minnows. Commonly used as a fun recess activity for elementary school students.

If a "shark" tags a "minnow", they become "seaweed" and can't move from where they're tagged for the rest of the game. Another "sharks and minnows" variant is played in swimming pools.

One player is selected as the "shark" and starts on the opposite side of the pool from the rest of the "minnows" i. Any "minnows" who are tagged above the water's surface while crossing the pool then join the "shark s " for the next round.

The game finishes when only one, or zero depending on local variation, "minnow" is left. In nineteenth century Warwickshire , a variant called fox and dowdy or fox-a'-dowdy was played across a lane or similar area.

In this version, the catcher catches players by holding them and reciting the phrase "Fox a' dowdy—catch a candle".

In the variant called hopping jinny also known as hop the barger , hopping caesar , hop and dodge , hoppy bowfie , cock , cockaroosha , cockarusty , cockie duntie , cock heaving , and hopping cockerals each player must hop at all times with their arms folded across their chests.

The catcher captures players by barging into them and forcing them to put their other foot down. This game has been recorded across England in the early to mid twentieth century. Melisa Peterson This game rules and, I recomend it for an outdoor theamed party.

But we call it octopus. I used to play up my road with all the other kids, We had some good laughs :. TMH 10 turning I've played it during my sports lessons!

Nice Game! This is fun but it isn't very original. It's like Sharks and Minnows with fewer taggers. It seems great for a really big group of kids. It might be a tad unadvanced, though.

Rob This was a great game when I was a kid Yeah it's OK. But it's not original! It's just like tag, kinda. This sounds pretty good for an out-door game Recent Comments.

Black Magic what's the trick tho? Empire Game jbjhgj. Black Magic Me to. Pig Out fsdfsf. Prize Ball Yeah that would be really fun! Instead of just Our Latest Monthly Stats:.

how to play british bulldog

It originated in the United Kingdom. Many British schools in the 21st century still do not allow children to play it, but some schools allow children to play it as long as it is non-contact i.

Sharks and Minnows derives from a German war game called Minsk und Reich. As is usual with games, the particular rules applied vary from location to location, but with the same principle.

The playing area consists of a main playing area, with two 'home' areas on opposing sides similar to the try-zone areas used in rugby or American football. The home areas are the width of the playing area and are usually marked by a line or some other marker.

Each game of bulldogs consists of a sequence of rounds, and it is usual to play a number of games one after another with different bulldogs each time. The game is initiated with a single player or sometimes two or more players as the "bulldog" or "catcher" between the home areas and the other players together in one of the home areas.

The objective for the non-bulldog players is to run from one home area to the other whilst avoiding the bulldog s in the middle. In the later stages of the game the bulldogs will outnumber the remaining non-bulldog players, which can make captures especially rough as many bulldogs attempt to capture individual players.

The method of choosing of the first bulldog s is subject to variation. In one version, the bulldog is selected by all players standing in a circle with their legs apart and a tennis ball being bounced in the centre; whoever's legs the ball goes through is "it".

Sometimes, the players must run to a set target, the last one there becoming the bulldog. In later games, either the first or the last players caught in the previous game may become the bulldog s for the next game.

Each round is usually initiated by the bulldog s chanting and goading, often naming a player to be the first to attempt the run from one home area to the other.

In some versions all of the non-bulldogs rush across at once, in others this rush is triggered, either by the bulldog s or by the named player. Once players are out of the home area the bulldog s can attempt to 'catch' them; caught players become bulldogs as well.

The method by which a runner is caught varies according to local custom. It is common for a player to be caught by the bulldog s either holding the non-bulldog off the ground, or by tackling the non-bulldog and holding them stationary, while the bulldog exclaims a phrase such as "British bulldog; one, two, three!

A simpler alternative is for the bulldog s to just touch the non-bulldog s head or back and exclaim the appropriate phrase. Capture by tackling or lifting was popular in the twentieth century, although tackling has become more common than lifting in the modern version of the game.

In some versions, non-bulldogs also become bulldogs if they cross a boundary equivalent to a touch-line. It can be a valid method of capture for a bulldog to force a non-bulldog over the boundary.

If the non-bulldog player s successfully enter the opposing home area without being caught, they are considered 'safe' and may not be caught by the bulldog s.

Players are also safe while they remain in their original home area, although there are sometimes rules for how long they may remain there. The rush also known as the 'bullrush', 'open gates' or 'stampede' may be triggered by the bulldog or the single, named player shouting a phrase such as "bulldog" or "bullrush", or it may occur when the named player is either captured or safe in the other home area.

However, in other versions only the first player caught in each round becomes a bulldog, catching other players is simply for fun and has no strategic advantage.

The aim of the game for the bulldogs is to catch all the players as quickly as possible, whilst the aim for the other players is to stay uncaught for as long as possible.

The last player to be caught is usually considered the winner. A variant called bacca also known as action and fox and dowdy was played in the nineteenth century at King Edward's School, Birmingham.

In this version, the home areas were either end of the cloisters. A catcher must hold another player and say the phrase "One, two, three, caught, tobacco" to capture them.

The phrase was the source of the game's name. In a similarly titled version called baccare , the rush is triggered by the leader of the non-catcher players calling "Baccare" or by any of the players being tricked into saying it by the catcher s.

An example given is a catcher asking "What does your father smoke? In the variant black tom , from early twentieth century America, the catcher triggers the rush of players by shouting "Black Tom" three times.

The catcher may attempt to trick players by shouting a false signal, such as "Black Tim" or "Red Tom"; any players who attempt to run on such a signal are automatically caught and join the catcher.

Chinese wall or hill, dill, come over the hill is another variant, where the catcher is confined between two lines smaller than the larger field the "wall" and players must cross the "wall" without being caught.

A variant recorded in Marlborough, Wiltshire was called click. In this game, being the catcher was known as going Click. The catcher s caught other players by holding them while saying the phrase "One, two, three, I catch thee; help me catch another.

A variant recorded in the late nineteenth century is cock. In this game, the catcher is known as "cock" and there is no named, single player; all the non-catcher players run from one home area to the other at once.

The cock attempts to capture or "croon" in this version the other players by putting their hand on the non-catcher player's head. A similar game was played in Scotland called rexa-boxa-king. In this game, the catcher is called "king" or "queen" and triggers the rush with the phrase "rexa-boxa-king" or "rexa-boxa".

The last player captured becomes king in the next game. Runners begin at the top of a steep, heavily forested hill and catchers are positioned about half-way down the hill.

A gentler variant popular in Britain is fishy fishy. The set up is the same as bulldog, with a group of runners on one side of the area and one or two catchers in the middle.

The runners chant a phrase such as "Fishy, Fishy, may we cross your golden water? In The Midlands of England, the phrase "Please Mr[s] Crocodile, can we cross the water in a cup and saucer, upside down?

This means the runners run across in smaller groups, instead of one large group, and the catchers only typically need to tag the runners to turn them into catchers, rather than tackle them to the ground.

A variant in America similar to fishy fishy is sharks and minnows , in which the original selected player s are the sharks, who attempt to "eat" the minnows. Commonly used as a fun recess activity for elementary school students.

If a "shark" tags a "minnow", they become "seaweed" and can't move from where they're tagged for the rest of the game. Another "sharks and minnows" variant is played in swimming pools.

One player is selected as the "shark" and starts on the opposite side of the pool from the rest of the "minnows" i. Any "minnows" who are tagged above the water's surface while crossing the pool then join the "shark s " for the next round.

The game finishes when only one, or zero depending on local variation, "minnow" is left. In nineteenth century Warwickshire , a variant called fox and dowdy or fox-a'-dowdy was played across a lane or similar area.

In this version, the catcher catches players by holding them and reciting the phrase "Fox a' dowdy—catch a candle". In the variant called hopping jinny also known as hop the barger , hopping caesar , hop and dodge , hoppy bowfie , cock , cockaroosha , cockarusty , cockie duntie , cock heaving , and hopping cockerals each player must hop at all times with their arms folded across their chests.

The catcher captures players by barging into them and forcing them to put their other foot down. This game has been recorded across England in the early to mid twentieth century.

Another recorded hopping variant is known as hopping bases. In this version, there is an area in the centre between the two home areas called the "castle". The catcher is known as the "king" and starts in the castle; anyone caught by the King becomes one of the king's "soldiers".

The non-catcher players must hop between the home areas. The king and soldiers capture other players by touching them or forcing them to put both feet down. If the king puts both feet down, they have to return to the castle before they can capture any more players.

There is also a team version of hopping bases in which players split into teams and each own one of the home areas. Sooooo sharks and minnows?

Reply will be posted once approved. That's pretty much what it is. Advolt Play this game all the time and it's fab! The more people the better! This Game is also known as the Lion cage, where the boundries cannot be crossed.

Melisa Peterson This game rules and, I recomend it for an outdoor theamed party. But we call it octopus.

I used to play up my road with all the other kids, We had some good laughs :. TMH 10 turning I've played it during my sports lessons! Nice Game! This is fun but it isn't very original. It's like Sharks and Minnows with fewer taggers.

It seems great for a really big group of kids. It might be a tad unadvanced, though. Rob This was a great game when I was a kid Yeah it's OK. But it's not original! It's just like tag, kinda.

This sounds pretty good for an out-door game Recent Comments. Black Magic what's the trick tho?

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To play this game on Kongregate, you must have a current version of Adobe's Flash Player enabled. The game finishes when only one, or zero depending on local variation, "minnow" is left. The non-catcher players must hop between the home areas. Chuck Spitler on Lavatory Man song. Add this game to your web page! Random House. Oregon Department of Education. In this game, the catcher is called "king" or "queen" and triggers the rush with the phrase "rexa-boxa-king" or "rexa-boxa". The Lore of the Playground.

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Daily Record. Your game will start after this how to play british bulldog continue reading. Yes, you bow find a lot of discussions related to link how to play british bulldog Y8 games. An example given is a catcher asking "What does your father smoke? A variant called how to play british bulldog also known as action and fox and dowdy was played in the nineteenth century at King Edward's School, Birmingham. In the variant called hopping jinny also known as hop the bargerhopping caesarhop and dodgehoppy bowfiecockcockarooshacockarustycockie duntiecock heavingand hopping cockerals each player must hop at all times with their arms folded across their chests. Only registered users can vote without verification.

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Host Your How to play british bulldog on Kongregate Article source open platform for all web games! Gymoutdoor and playground how to play british bulldog. Tags See all. Robert Dubs brotish Dirty Socks skit. Players are also safe while they remain in their original home area, although there are sometimes rules for how long they may remain there. In England and Walesdespite the Local Government Association 's encouragement of traditional playground games such as British bulldog, more than a quarter of teachers surveyed in said the game had been banned at their schools.

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