The most recent example of a coach successfully using the 4 out 1 in motion is Jay Wright at Villanova who led the Wildcats to the championship in the — season.

The 4-out 1-in motion offense can be run by any team. I highly recommend this offense for teams with a strong post player as the spacing on the court makes it hard to trap the post. Teaches Players How to Play Basketball — This is the most important trait I look for when choosing a youth basketball offense.

A decision-making continuity like the 4-out 1-in motion offense develops basketball IQ and will assist players to be the best they can be in the future.

When in the wing and slot spots, the players will be about 18 feet apart. Can Adjust to Any Skill Level — Due to the progressions of this offense, the 4-out 1-in can be as complex as you want or as simple as you want.

It can be a great offense for a youth team simply running cuts, or a great offense for a professional team by utilizing all the different actions and reads.

Easily Exploits Mismatches — You can exploit mismatches anywhere on the court. Reading Others on the Court — While I believe it is easy to learn if taught correctly, it can be difficult for young players to execute during games because the offense relies on players reading the other 9 players on the court and making decisions.

Fortunately, not many youth coaches will do this. Keep Great Spacing — This is the most important rule of the offense. Perimeter players should always be about 18 feet away from each other.

This involves showing target hands and calling for the basketball. Watch the Cutters! Always Catch Looking to Shoot — Players must keep the defense honest throughout the entire possession.

Save the dribble. Only dribble when penetrating to the rim, using an on-ball screen, or improving a passing angle. Many coaches simply allow their post player to move anywhere they feel like inside and around the paint.

This will never work! This is my favorite way to utilize the post player when running the 4-out 1-in and will be the option I refer to throughout this article.

It involves the post player staying on the weak side of the floor but giving them the opportunity to flash to either the low or high post if they see an opportunity to do so a certain number of times per possession.

The benefits to keeping the post player on the weak side of the floor for the majority of the possession are:. Be patient when first implementing this offense as it will take time for the post players on your team to learn which opportunities are best to take.

I recommend you begin by allowing them to flash to the basketball one time per possession. For this option, we remove the post players opportunities to flash to the basketball throughout the possession.

I want to make it clear that using this option will not result in the post player being left out of the offense completely. There will still be plenty of drive and dish opportunities as well as offensive rebounding opportunities.

You want to keep the lane open to the ring for drives, passes, and cuts for the entire possession. The theory behind this post option is to take advantage of a post player who is more effective on one side of the floor while keeping the other side open for drives to the rim.

There can also be pre-determined actions that can only be run on specific sides of the floor. Keep your post player on the weak side of the floor and allow them to flash to the basketball a certain amount of times per possession.

To decide which option is best, I recommend evaluating each player on your team who will play in the post and decide which option is best for each post player individually. Post players must earn the right to be allowed to flash to the basketball and create a shot for themselves or a teammate from the post.

Also, ensure that all players on your team understand how to play the post position. This is also a great strategy to use when one of the opposition players gets in foul trouble.

The other thing you should understand before we get into the heart of the offense is how players must fill around the perimeter. When filling spots around the perimeter players must read their defender and make one of two cuts.

If the defender is within one step of the line to the basketball, the player must v-cut to get themselves open on the perimeter. If the defender is two steps or further away from the line of the basketball, the offensive player should blast cut towards the basketball.

For the post player, there are 4 spots around the paint they can move to depending on whether on how you decide to use them within the offense. I have broken the 4 out 1 in motion offense down into 7 progressions to teach a team the offense from scratch.

The reason we teach in progressions is because it makes the offense far easier to understand and also because it allows players to start learning the basics of a complex offense from a young age.

Instead, use this method and only advanced to the next progression when your team can complete the current progression with minimal mistakes. Once your players understand the complete offense, there are also many additional actions that you can choose to implement based on the skill level of the players on your team.

The first progression involves basic passing, basket cuts, and filling the spots around the perimeter. This is the simplest way to teach players the different positions on the court and get them used to the different cutting movements involved in the offense.

Since the only spot left to fill is their own, 3 cuts back out to the ball-side wing. Since there is a spot to fill closer to the basketball, 3 v-cuts and replaces 4.

The next progression will be much quicker than the first since it involves the same cutting and filling strategies as progression 1. Explain to your players that any time their defender has a hand in the passing lane whilst the player with the basketball is one-pass away and looking at you, you must back cut immediately.

If 4 is being overplayed by their defender, they immediately back cut looking to receive the pass from 3. If 2 is being denied by their defender, they must back cut through the paint looking for the pass.

If the defender is denying the pass, back cut immediately! One of the perimeter rules is: If you think you can beat your defender off the dribble and get to the ring, do it! With all the movement in the offense, the defenders will be constantly closing out late.

This provides the offense with a great opportunity to attack the ring and create shots off dribble penetration. Create a passing lane. The only deviation from this is on a baseline drive from a wing player.

When this happens, the post player must get to the front of the rim. This creates the best passing opportunity to the post player and also open up the hammer pass to the opposite baseline corner.

Each player must read where their defender is and create a passing lane so they can receive the kick out pass for the open shot.

This means attacking just outside of the defenders hips which keeps the dribbler in their lane and keeps great spacing. The next step in the offense is to give players a second option after passing the basketball in addition to cutting to the basket….

For this progression, the player who receives the screen must always curl off the screen to the basket and the player who sets the screen must always pop back out to their original position after screening.

This screen can occur on a slot to slot pass or a slot to wing pass. This means the screeners back should be facing towards where the cutter wants to go the rim. Since players are only curling off the screen, the screen should be set on the back hip of the defender.

The fifth progression involves giving players a third option to perform after they have passed the basketball to a teammate. When a player makes any pass during the offense, they can step up and set an on-ball screen for the player with the basketball.

For the screen to be effective, the player with the basketball must be patient and wait until the screen is set before using the screen.

The post player should immediately find a good passing angle when their defender rotates to help on the player with the basketball.

While the players will now be experienced with curling off an away screen, we will also give them the option to straight cut depending on how the defense reacts to the screen. A straight cut will involve the player filling the spot that was occupied by the player setting the screen.

If this option is used, the screener cuts to the rim looking for the pass and then fills to the perimeter as normal. Seeing this, 4 rolls to the front of the rim looking for the catch and layup.

Instead of curling to the rim, 2 straight cuts to the slot position getting ready to catch and shoot. If the defender is trailing them, curl to the rim. If the defender cheats under the screen, straight cut.

This is an efficient way to get the basketball around the perimeter when you want to get the basketball into a specific position. For example, if you wanted to get the basketball into the low post from the wing but the wing is being denied.

For youth basketball, I recommend only using the back cut option every time one player dribbles at another. If the pass is open, 4 will pass to 2.

If not, 4 continues dribbling to the wing position. Seeing that there is no back cut opportunity, 2 steps forward and receives the handoff from 4. If a back cut is run, all players must fill towards the basketball.

Once your team is comfortable with the 7 progressions of the 4-out 1-in continuity motion your team will have a very solid base offense with many options and also an offense that will develop basketball IQ.

This occurs as players start to learn the strengths and weaknesses of their teammates and make decisions accordingly. There are many additional actions that you can run out of the base 4-out 1-in motion offense that are optional inclusions.

Call these actions out of time-outs, out-of-bounds, or when you need a basket in a crucial moment of the game. This forces the other defenders to focus on their player and make adjustments to their position instead of allowing them to double team or read the post player.

If the low post player is on or below the low block, it leaves little opportunity for this cut to be effective. When this happens, the alternative cut is to make a Laker cut. A Laker cut is a cut to the strong-side elbow and then through to the baseline corner.

The wing player must cut baseline so that the help defenders must move and rotate out of position. For this offense, we will rely on 2 or 3 players to fight for offensive rebounds depending on where the shot is taken from the outside.

If the shot is taken from inside the three-point line, encourage players inside the key to fight for offensive boards and those outside the three-point line to transition back on defense.

If the outside shot is taken from the wing, the weak-side wing player must sprint in to rebound on the weak-side while the post player fights for position in front of the rim.

This leaves us with 3 players who must immediately transition back onto defense. If the outside shot is taken from the top of the key, both weak-side wing players sprint in to rebound on their respective sides while the post player fights for position at the front of the rim.

This leaves the two slot players to transition back on defense. The simplest thing you can do is get the basketball to your best playmaker or scorer, and then sprint your post player out to set an on-ball screen for them.

Option 1 - Pass to Post continued Ball side wing 2 goes hard backdoor looking for pass from post. This pass will be with the posts outside hand left in this case.

Post is pivoting on inside foot. Point guard 1 fills wing spot. Weak side post 5 screens for weak side wing who cuts to fill point position. Option 1 - Pass to Post continued If wing 2 doesn't get backdoor pass he continues through to the basket and hooks back looking for another pass from the post.

This pass from the post will be after he has pivoted towards the basket. If the second pass is not available the wing 2 continues through the key to fill the weak side wing spot.

Weak side post can cut to the basket to look for pass, or return to high post. If ball is passed back out to new point 3 the offense is reset.

Option 2 - Dribble Entry This option can be run to either side of the court. Point guard 1 indicates dribble entry with verbal call or other signal. Ball side wing 2 cuts to basket looking for pass.

If not on he flares to the corner. Ball side post rolls to basket looking for pass.

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A straight cut will involve the player filling the spot that was occupied by the player setting the screen. If this option is used, the screener cuts to the rim looking for the pass and then fills to the perimeter as normal.

Seeing this, 4 rolls to the front of the rim looking for the catch and layup. Instead of curling to the rim, 2 straight cuts to the slot position getting ready to catch and shoot.

If the defender is trailing them, curl to the rim. If the defender cheats under the screen, straight cut. This is an efficient way to get the basketball around the perimeter when you want to get the basketball into a specific position.

For example, if you wanted to get the basketball into the low post from the wing but the wing is being denied. For youth basketball, I recommend only using the back cut option every time one player dribbles at another.

If the pass is open, 4 will pass to 2. If not, 4 continues dribbling to the wing position. Seeing that there is no back cut opportunity, 2 steps forward and receives the handoff from 4.

If a back cut is run, all players must fill towards the basketball. Once your team is comfortable with the 7 progressions of the 4-out 1-in continuity motion your team will have a very solid base offense with many options and also an offense that will develop basketball IQ.

This occurs as players start to learn the strengths and weaknesses of their teammates and make decisions accordingly. There are many additional actions that you can run out of the base 4-out 1-in motion offense that are optional inclusions.

Call these actions out of time-outs, out-of-bounds, or when you need a basket in a crucial moment of the game. This forces the other defenders to focus on their player and make adjustments to their position instead of allowing them to double team or read the post player.

If the low post player is on or below the low block, it leaves little opportunity for this cut to be effective. When this happens, the alternative cut is to make a Laker cut.

A Laker cut is a cut to the strong-side elbow and then through to the baseline corner. The wing player must cut baseline so that the help defenders must move and rotate out of position.

For this offense, we will rely on 2 or 3 players to fight for offensive rebounds depending on where the shot is taken from the outside. If the shot is taken from inside the three-point line, encourage players inside the key to fight for offensive boards and those outside the three-point line to transition back on defense.

If the outside shot is taken from the wing, the weak-side wing player must sprint in to rebound on the weak-side while the post player fights for position in front of the rim.

This leaves us with 3 players who must immediately transition back onto defense. If the outside shot is taken from the top of the key, both weak-side wing players sprint in to rebound on their respective sides while the post player fights for position at the front of the rim.

This leaves the two slot players to transition back on defense. The simplest thing you can do is get the basketball to your best playmaker or scorer, and then sprint your post player out to set an on-ball screen for them.

This advanced option can be a very effective if you have experienced players who can run this quickly and efficiently. Instead of the post player sprinting out to set an immediate screen on the player with the basketball, they first set a UCLA screen for the ball-side slot player who cuts through looking for the basketball and quickly pops out to the weak side.

Immediately after setting this screen the post player takes a few short steps to the wing and sets and on-ball screen for the player with the basketball. If forces all defenders to rotate an extra position and stay with their player.

If we only set a straight ball-screen the weak-side defenders will already be in help position. Provides the offense with an extra opportunity via the slot player cutting to the rim off the UCLA cut.

For both of these options the post player must sprint to the screen to create separation between them and the post defender for best chances of success out of the ball-screen.

With a few adjustments the 4-out 1-in motion offense can easily be run against a zone defense. For it to be most effective and easy for the players to understand, we want to do our best to stay within the structure of our current offense with minimal changes.

As the basketball is swung around the perimeter the post player should establish a deep post seal on the inside zone player. Within any zone there is an area between the bottom line of defenders and the free-throw line that is usually left open for a majority of the possession.

The player cutting can hold this position for seconds before continuing their cut to fill the perimeter. Often the middle player of the zone will have to step up leaving an easy drop-down pass to our post player for the layup.

When playing against a zone you can often find a big advantage by changing the role of your post player and keeping them on the ball-side of the zone. Since we play the wing spots high on free-throw line extended, the bottom post player is often forced to rotate out and help to stop open shooters.

If the middle player of the zone steps out to help the middle of the zone will be open for cutters to receive the pass for an open layup. Pass, Cut, and Fill 2. Dribble Penetration 4. Away Screen — Curl Cuts Only 5.

On-Ball Screen 6. Away Screen — Add the Straight Cut 7. Dribble At. Along with the 5-out motion and read and react offense, the 4-out 1-in motion offense is one of my main recommendations for all youth basketball teams.

Strengths Teaches Players How to Play Basketball — This is the most important trait I look for when choosing a youth basketball offense. Post player must stay on the weak side but can flash to the post Recommended This is my favorite way to utilize the post player when running the 4-out 1-in and will be the option I refer to throughout this article.

Post player must always stay on the weak side the entire possession. The two main reasons a coach might decide to use this option are: a. Post player must always stay on one side of the floor the entire possession.

So, which post option should you choose? To recap, here are the two post options I recommend: 1. Keep the post player on the weak side of the floor at all times.

Filling Around the Perimeter The other thing you should understand before we get into the heart of the offense is how players must fill around the perimeter. We call them the slots and the wings.

These perimeter spots should be a step outside the three-point line to maintain ideal spacing. These are the two low blocks and the two elbows.

Teaching the Base 4-Out 1-In Motion Offense I have broken the 4 out 1 in motion offense down into 7 progressions to teach a team the offense from scratch. Progression 1 — Pass, Cut, and Fill The first progression involves basic passing, basket cuts, and filling the spots around the perimeter.

There are two things that happen during this progression: Every time a player passes the basketball, they must cut. On each cut, all players must fill towards the basketball. Wing to Slot Pass 1.

Everyone else holds their positions since there are no spaces to fill. Slot to Slot Pass 1. Progression 2 — Add Back Cuts to Pass, Cut, and Fill The next progression will be much quicker than the first since it involves the same cutting and filling strategies as progression 1.

And never hesitate. No exceptions. Overplaying a Slot to Wing Pass 1. All other players stay in their spots since there are no spots to fill.

Overplaying a Wing to Slot Pass 1. Overplaying a Slot to Slot Pass 1. Middle Drive from the Wing 1. Baseline Drive from the Slot 1. Middle Drive from the Slot 1.

Progression 4: Away Screen — Curl Cuts Only The next step in the offense is to give players a second option after passing the basketball in addition to cutting to the basket… Giving players the option to screen away.

Instead of basket cutting, 1 decides to set an away screen for 4. Away Screen on a Slot to Slot Pass 1. Instead of cutting to the basket, 1 decides to set an away screen for 3.

Progression 5: On-Ball Screen The fifth progression involves giving players a third option to perform after they have passed the basketball to a teammate. Setting an on-ball screen. The screener stays behind to play safety.

Slot to Wing On-Ball Screen 1. Wing to Slot On-Ball Screen 1. Progression 6: Away Screen — Add the Straight Cut Next, we give another cutting option to a player receiving an away screen.

The straight cut. The screener must watch the cutter and go opposite. Instead of cutting to the basket, 4 sets an away screen for 1. Away Screen on Slot to Slot Pass 1. Reading this, 4 cuts off the screen to the rim looking for the easy layup.

This action involves one player dribbling at another player which can cause one of two actions: A dribble handoff. A back cut This is an efficient way to get the basketball around the perimeter when you want to get the basketball into a specific position.

For high school and above, feel free to use both options. Noticing this, 2 immediately back cuts. Slot to Wing Dribble At Handoff 1.

This will take some time to get to the point where your players look fluid on the court. Option 1 - Pass to Post continued Ball side wing 2 goes hard backdoor looking for pass from post.

This pass will be with the posts outside hand left in this case. Post is pivoting on inside foot. Point guard 1 fills wing spot. Weak side post 5 screens for weak side wing who cuts to fill point position.

Option 1 - Pass to Post continued If wing 2 doesn't get backdoor pass he continues through to the basket and hooks back looking for another pass from the post. This pass from the post will be after he has pivoted towards the basket.

If the second pass is not available the wing 2 continues through the key to fill the weak side wing spot. Weak side post can cut to the basket to look for pass, or return to high post.

If ball is passed back out to new point 3 the offense is reset. Option 2 - Dribble Entry This option can be run to either side of the court. Point guard 1 indicates dribble entry with verbal call or other signal.

Ball side wing 2 cuts to basket looking for pass. If not on he flares to the corner. Ball side post rolls to basket looking for pass.

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Save the dribble. Since we play the wing spots high on free-throw line extended, the bottom post player is often forced to rotate out and help to stop open shooters. Strengths Teaches Players How to Play Basketball — This is the most important trait I look for when choosing a youth basketball offense. Give and go plays work example: O2 passes to O4 and cuts to the hoop for the pass back from O4. Recommended Resource: Offenses Playbook The Offenses playbook includes 26 simple, fun and effective plays run from the set. Post Seal the Middle of the Zone As the basketball is swung around the perimeter the post player should establish a deep post seal on the inside zone player. If the defender is within one step of the line to the basketball, the player must v-cut to get themselves open on the perimeter. Use those plays that will best benefit your team. Instead of the post player sprinting out to set an immediate screen on the player with the basketball, they first set a UCLA screen for the ball-side slot player who cuts through looking for the basketball and quickly pops out to the weak side.

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Counter to Loop 2, sets 1 4 offense basketball plays a 1 4 offense basketball plays ball played at live aid. Or download one of our basketball playbooks in PDF format. Link, attacking the offenesis often http://howwouldyouvote.us/edmonton-oilers-play-by-play.html when the offenwe player link located on the opposite weakside low block. Fortunately, not many youth coaches will do this. This means the screeners back should be facing towards where the cutter wants to go the rim. If you are fortunate enough to have some assistant coaches or managers and can have them pass, then you can run through your offense and get game spot shots at the same time.

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A back 1 4 offense basketball plays This is an efficient way to get the basketball around the perimeter when you want to get the basketball into a specific to play drums free. This hand off 1 4 offense basketball plays basketball 1 4 offense basketball plays is going to take advantage of the defense falling asleep and not staying engaged to the cutter. High school and more advanced level teams that have more practice time, can expand and use the basic 4-out motion offense, and the "4-High" and "4-Low" sets. Outside players should be moving, screening for each other on-ball screen and screen away. You can have your players line up in the high, or the low. I only ran the high against man to man. Give and go plays work example: O2 passes to O4 and cuts to the hoop for the pass back from O4.

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